BOARD OF GOVERNORS
    NOTICE OF MEETING
    March 3, 2020
    The Agenda and documents for the Open Sessiomn eeting of the Board of Governors f o
    Concordia Universityhel d on Wednesday, March 10, 2021, at 4 p.mare . now posted on
    the website.
    Please note that while there is an Open Session, given that the meeting is being held by
    video conference, only Governor, s resources and invited guests will be admitted to the
    meeting.
    Exceptionally, the Open Session meeting will be recorded anmd ade available for
    viewing on the
    Board website
    for one week following the meetingT. he recording
    will be removed and deleted thereafter.
    Danielle Tessier
    Secretary of the Board of Governors

    2
    4:20
    9.
    Finance Committee recommendation regarding
    revisions to
    Procurement Policy
    (CFO-20) (BG-2021- 2-
    D6)
    K. Brooks/
    D. Cossette
    Approval
    4:30
    10.
    Presentation on future of work-integrated learning
    N. Bhuiyan
    Information
    4:55
    11.
    Other business
    5:00
    12.
    Adjournment
    H. Antoniou

    BG-2020 -8
    MINUTES OF THEO PEN SESSION
    OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS
    Held on Wednesday, December 9, 2020, at 4. m.p
    via Zoom Video Conferencing
    PRESENT
    Governors: Helen Antoniou,
    Chair
    , Françoise Bertrand, Jeff Bicher, Antoinette Bozac, Ken
    Brooks, William Bukowski, Graham Carr,
    President and V-Cicheancellor
    , Gina P. Cody,
    Selvadurai Dayanandan, Pat Di Lillo, Adriana Embiric, osRana Ghorayeb, Claude Jo-lCi oeur,
    Vice-Chair
    , Isaiah Joyner, Claudine MangenF, rédérica Martin,
    Vic-eChair
    , Georges Paulez,
    Philippe Pourreaux,Pr asanth Shunmugan, Ted Stathopoulos
    Alternate Governor: Chelsea Okankwu
    Also attending: Philippe Beauregard, Robert Cassidy, William CheaPibau, l Chesser,
    Denis Cossette, Michael Di Grappa,
    Sandra Gabriele, Nadia HardyFr, ederica Jacobs, Lisa
    Ostiguy, Anne Whitelaw, Carolina Willsher, Paula Woo-dAdams
    ABSENT
    Governors: Roy Cross, Caroline Jamet, Odile Joannetteu, zanS ne Sauvage
    Non-voting observer: Jonathan Wener
    C
    ,
    hancellor
    1.
    Call to Order
    The Chair called the meeting too rder at4: 05 p.m., welcomingPr asanth Shunmugan who
    was attending his first meeting.
    She also congratulated Françoise Bertrand, appointed Commander of the Order of
    Montreal, Ken Brooks, winner of the M&A Club Award for Deal of the Year (over
    $20 million) in the financial advisor category, and Ted Stathopoulos, for receiving the
    Honorary Genius Award, presented for the first time this year, from the Ordre des
    Ingénieurs du Québec.
    1.1
    Adoption of the Agenda
    Upon motion duly moved and seconded, it wasn aunimously RESOLVED:
    R-2020- 8-1
    That the Agenda be approved, ni cluding the items on the Consent Agenda.

    2
    CONSENT
    2.
    Adoption of the October 21, 2020 Minutes
    R-2020-8-2
    That the Minutes of the meeting of October 21, 2020 be approved.
    3.
    Audit Committee report (BG-2020- 8-D1)
    4.
    Finance Committee report (BG-2020- 8-D2)
    5.
    Governance and Ethics Committee report (BG-2020- 8-D3)
    6.
    Human Resources Committee report (BG-2020 -8-D4)
    These reports were submitted for informatio. n
    7.
    Collection of undergraduate student fee levies (BG-2020 -8-D5)
    R-2020- 8-3
    CJLO Campus Radio
    That the Board of Governors authorize Concordia University to collect a fee levy to $0.43
    per credit (an increase of $0.09 per credit from $0.34 per credit) to support the CJLO
    1960 AM Campus Radio, from all undergraduate students, annually adjusted to the
    Consumer Price Index of Canada, to be implemented with registration for the Winter
    2021 (2204) term, in accordance with the University’s tuint, iorefund and withdrawal
    policy.
    Student Care Integrated Virtual Telemedecine
    That the Board of Governors authorize Concordia University to collect a fee levy of
    $19.52 per semester to support the Student’s care integrated virtual medicine, from all
    undergraduate students, to be implemented with registratoni for the Winter 2021 (2204)
    term, i
    ncluding the administration of an “op-tout” option in the Fall and Winter,
    independent of the main plan,
    in accordance with the University’s tuition, refund and
    withdrawal policy.
    8.
    Request for the use of the Concordia name (BG-2020- 8-D6)
    R-2020-8-4
    That, subject to the conditions set out in the Policy on the Use of Concordia University’s
    Name, Logo and Related Insignia, and the Governance of its Visual Character and
    Digital Presence
    (
    SG-4
    ), the Board of Governors approve the followinreg quest to use the
    Concordia name:
    Concordia Mentorship Among Psychology Students (MAPS) Committee
    9.
    Report on compliance with envirnomental legislation and health and safety (EH&S)
    regulations (BG-2020- 8-D7)
    This report was provided for information.
    REGULAR

    3
    10.
    Business arising from the Minutes not included on the Agenda
    There was no business arising from the Minutes not incleud d on the Agenda.
    11.
    President’s report (BG-2020- 7-D8)
    Dr. Carr reiterated the congratulations expressed by Ms. Antonioanu d added the
    following as complementary information to his written repo: rt
    Alumnus Howard Alper was promoted to the rank of Compniaon within the Order
    of Canada, while alumni Ella Amir and Elliot R. Lifson were appointed Member of
    the Order of Canada together with retired professor Elizabeth Langley, founder of
    Concordia’s dance program.
    He congratulated the 1,831 graduates recognized on November 19as
    part of CU
    Celebrate.
    A series of virtual Town Halls are being hosted by various sectors across the
    University, which is a great way to engage with all members of the community and
    obtain feedback.
    The holiday break has been extended, the activities of the University resuming on
    January 11, and an additional day off for staff has been added during Reading
    Week.
    The Stingers participated in
    Giving Tuesday
    , a fundraising moment that takes place
    the first Tuesday after American haT nksgiving. Approximately $245,000 was raised
    in 24 hours to support Concordia athletes.
    Concordia’s Centraide Campaign raised an a-ltlime record of $204,000, surpassing
    our goal of $170,000.
    Concordia’s pension plan won the Investment Governance Award, given by the
    Canadian Investment Review. TheU niversity Treasurer and Chief Investment
    Officer, Marc Gauthier, and his team were recognized for their governance and
    reshaping of operations.
    The President also update the Board on other ongoing initiatives and grants and
    concluded by noting that hte Applied Science Hub on the Loyola Campus was officially
    inaugurated on December 1 via a virtual opening ceremony. This is the fourth major
    building to be erected on the Loyola Campus in the past 15 yearHs.
    e thanked the staff
    and faculty involved in planning and organizing of the event. The approximately 250
    guests and many more on Facebook Live were given a virtual tour of the LEED adherent
    facilities.
    12.
    Audit Committee recommendation regarding
    Information Technology Polic
    (
    y
    BG-2020- 8-
    D9)
    Committee Chair Georges Paulez introduced this item which isb eing recommended by
    the Audit Committee, further to review at its meetings Nof ovember 25, 2020. This Policy
    responds to the need to strengthen our processes regarding informan tiosecurity and
    ensures compliance with government guidelines.

    4
    Mr. Di Grappa summarized the highlights of the Policy. He noted that othlie cy P codifies
    the governance structure and clarifies the roles and responsibilities of the various
    committees having purview in IT governance. It also formalizes the data classification
    system and defines user responsibilitiesto cultivate the culture of information security.
    He added that the Policy also respons dto recommendations from two internal audit
    reports regarding identity and access management review and review of cloud
    management practices. Training is also a critical part of the Poli, cywhich provides for
    mandatory training on various modules, such as phishing, etc.
    A comprehensive institutional communications plan has been elaborated and will be
    deployed as of January 2021. In response to a question, Mr. Di Grappa made the point
    that the Policy covers data in possession of the University and will therefore apply to any
    individual, including students, whoi nteracts with our system.
    Upon motion duly moved and seconded, it was unanimously RESOLVED:
    R-2020- 8-5
    That, on recommendation of the Audit Committee,h e tBoard of Governors approve the
    Information Security Policy.
    13.
    Human Resources Committee recommendation regarding selected employment and
    evaluation policies (BG-2020- 8-D10)
    Committee Chair Jeff Bicher introduced this item which is being recommended by the
    Human Resources Committee, further to review at its meetings of November 20, 2020.
    For the benefit of new Governors, Me Jacobs explained that in August 2018 the
    government modified section 5.11 of the
    Règles budgétaires et calculs des subventions de
    fonctionnement aux universités du Québec
    , (RB) which imposed a variety of restrictions on
    the remuneration of certain senior administrative personnel positions (collectively
    referred to as SAPS), retroactive to May 2018. In order to be in compliance with the RB, in
    October 2018, the Board adopted the Omnibus Policy.
    Since then, a small working group mt eregularly to review all existing employment and
    remuneration policies of senior management personnel to ensure that those policies
    comply with the RB as well as to harmonize and modernize them based upon
    employment practices and the evolution of employmnet contracts.
    Me Jacobs presented the highlights of the proposed modifications for each policy, as
    outlined in the table included in the documentation. She underlined which positions are
    within the scope of the current policies Policies B-8,
    D HR-39 and HR-40. She explained
    that since the Academic Deans and theU niversity Librarian are excluded from the scope
    of the RB, those positions have been removed from Policy BD8 a-nd will be housed in a
    separate policy. She also conveyed the decision to add thes iptioons of Associate Vice-
    President (formerly in Policy H-R39), Deputy Provost and Vic-Pe rovost (formerly in
    Policy HR-40) to Policy BD-8, noting that the goal is to capture those senior roles in one
    policy.

    5
    Me Jacobs summarized the main policy changes as follows:
    Introduction of the definition of remuneration, which includes any possible sum
    paid for the fulfilment of employment duties. Stipends can only be paid if the
    additional position held on an interim basis is higher than the one occupied.
    Harmonization of the salary formula for all academic SAPS, with all annual salaries
    being fully pensionable.
    More restrictive provisions for academic SAPS’ administrative leave.
    Harmonization of vacation days to 25 days for all SAPS, Academic Deans and the
    University Librarian.
    Continued rigour of process for approval of expens. es
    Severance pay may not exceed one year of the base salary and cannot be paid if a
    SAP is terminated for cause, resigns or ceases to exercise their duties but remains
    employed by the University.
    Following the presentation, Me Jacobs, Ms. Willsher and Mr. Cossette responded to
    questions of clarification.
    Upon motion duly moved and seconded, it was unanimously RESOLVED:
    R-2020- 8-6
    That, on recommendation of the Human Resources Committete,
    he Board of Governors
    approve the revisions to the:
    Policy on Employment and Remuneration of Senior Administrators, Deputy
    Provosts, Vice-Provosts and Associate ViceP- residents (BD-8) (formerly entitled
    Policy on the Remuneration and Evaluation of Senir oAdministrators)
    Policy on Employment and Remuneration of Academic Administrators (H-4R0)
    (formerly entitled Remuneration and Evaluation Guidelines for Academic
    Administrators)
    Policy on Employment and Remuneration ofMan agerial and Other Employees not
    Governed by a Collective or Other Employment Agreement (H-3R9) (formerly
    entitled Remuneration and Evaluation Guidelines for Managerial and Other
    Employees not Governed by a Collective or Other Agreement); and
    Omnibus Policy on the Remuneration of Senior Administrative Personnel (-BD
    11); and
    That the Human Resources Committee recommend that the Board of Governors approve
    the Policy on Employment and Remuneration of the Academic Deans and the
    University Librarian.
    14.
    Presentation on future of teaching and- leearning (BG-2020- 8-D11 )
    Sandra Gabriele, Vice-Provost, Innovation in Teaching and Learning and Robert Cassidy,
    Director, Centre for Teaching and Learning Service(s CTL), presented an update on the
    state of teaching and learning at Concordia 10 months into the pandemic, the full details

    6
    of which are outlined in the document included in the Board package and summarized as
    follows:
    The massive transition to remote delivery done in March was based on four guiding
    principles:
    Evidence-based approaches, which are learner-focused and based on best practices for
    online learning;
    Accessibility and flexibility, to take into account the variability in student contexts, and
    using Moodle, the University’s learning management system, as one centralized place
    where all courses, documents and information can be accessed;
    Support faculty so that they can adapt rapidly; and
    Recognition that teaching and learning is a shared responsibility.
    Moodle use has more than tripled, which required an investment of $4 million toec dtliy r
    support faculty, the largest portion of that investment being spent on hiring teaching
    assistants.
    Since March 2020, CTL has been working to foresee the issues that faculty will run into
    and has provided support in the form of workshops, o-onne-one support, new web
    resources, department and Faculty consultations, Q&A, training and information sessions
    regarding Zoom invigilation and teaching tools such as protocols and best practices. Staff
    at CTL was significantlye xpanded from its pre-COVID size as were the services of
    KnowledgeOne.
    The most profound change related to transforming services hwich demanded new
    collaborations to create partnerships for teaching and learning that work well. This
    resulted in the establishment of a new permanent Advirsoy Committee on Teaching and
    Learning, which includes student representation. The Office of Institutional Planning
    provided some data, which can deepen the understanding of what is going on and
    provide some indicators of student success in connection witch ourse grades, GPAs, use
    of DISC and PASS options, the number of students remaining at the University and the
    number of new students coming to Concordia.
    More needs to be done, and the short term plans include enhancing Moodle to create a
    better learning experience. To that end, a new Moodle developer and a new Moodle
    specialist have been hired. Assessment is an issue but work will continue in order to
    create equitable evaluation and exam schemes for students. Improvements also need to
    be made on the ocmmunication from professor to student and student to student as well
    as on student workload and estimation guidelines. The Lab for Innovation in Teaching
    and Learning is up and running and providews ays to respond to changing learner needs
    and expectations and pedagogical practices and technologie. s
    In the short to medium term, we will need to look at what a mixed return to campus will
    look like, with a dual delivery of online and -pinerson classes, and establish principles in
    relation thereto. Pedagogeis will have to be developed to ensure student success and
    wellness. Shared priorities will have to be established on how to innovate in the future so
    that Faculties can develop the strategies that are appropriate for them or their disciplines.

    7
    Further to their presentation, Drs. Gabriele and Cassidy responded to questions and
    addressed comments from Governors.
    15.
    Other business
    There was no other business to bring before the meeting.
    16.
    Adjournment
    The Chair declared the meeting adjourned at 5:56 p.m.
    Danielle Tessier
    Secretary of the Board of Governors

    2
    PREPARED BY:
    Name:
    Danielle Tessier
    Date:
    February 9, 2021

    BG-20 21 -2-D4
    BOARD OF GOVERNORS
    OPEN SESSION
    Meeting ofMarc h 10, 2021
    AGENDA ITEM:
    Report on compliance with environmental legislation and health and
    safety (EH&S) regulations
    ACTION REQUIRED:
    For information
    SUMMARY:
    This report is provided to members of theB oard of Governors on a quarterly
    basis to apprise them of matters concerning EH&S at Concordia.
    PREPARED BY:
    Name:
    Danielle Tessier
    Date:
    March 2, 2021

    Due Diligence Report Q4 2020
    2
    /
    28
    Environmental Health & Safety
    (EHS)
    supports the academic, research and operational activities of the
    University and promotes a safe, healthy and sustainable campus environment. EHS manages and
    coordinates programs and services that minimize health, safety, environmental and regulatory risks. It
    also monitors compliance with federal and provincial health and safety legislation and internal
    university policies. We identify and evaluate risks, develop control strategies and implement
    appropriate internal procedures.
    Section A
    presents the university’s
    Leading Safety Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) which measure
    safety performance and help reflect the safety culture within the University.
    Section B
    presents the
    traditional Lagging Safety KPIs which are retrospective and which now include four incident/injury
    rates.
    2020 Summary
    In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic caused a significant reduction of activity on campus, particularly at the
    onset, which had a consequential impact on all of the
    universihealth
    antd
    ysafet’s
    y key performance
    indicators.
    2020 Leading Safety Key Performance Indicators Summary, compared to 2019:
    -
    9556 participants safety and security training, of which 6491 was COVID-related safety training
    (72% increase)
    -
    26 Injury & Near-Miss Investigations (38% decrease)
    -
    1344 Preventative Internal Inspections & Assessments (1230% increase)
    -
    277 Internal Non-Compliance Citations (341% decrease)
    -
    15 EHS Research Safety Compliance Reviews (69% decrease)
    2020 Lagging Safety Key Performance Indicators Summary, compared to 2019:
    -
    17% decrease in Total Injuries
    -
    48% decrease in Work-Related Injuries
    -
    36% decrease in Accepted Worker’Comps
    ensation Claims
    -
    67% increase in Lost-Time Day
    -
    68% decrease in Near-Misses
    -
    46% decrease in External Inspections
    -
    184% increase in Regulatory Non-Compliance Citations
    -
    84% decrease in Regulatory Fines
    -
    58% decrease in Hazardous Materials Emergency Response
    The one area not affected by the pandemic was the Regulatory Non-Compliance Citations. Although
    there were less inspections by regulatory agencies, this did not influence the number of citations.
    Although there was a 184% increase in Regulatory Non-Compliance Citations in 2020 compared to 2019,
    the actual number of non-compliance citations in 2020 was equal to the 5-year annual average (54).
    Suspected or Confirmed COVID-19 cases on Campus
    Concordia has been fortunate to have a limited number of reported COVID-19 cases on campus in 2020.
    At the onset of the pandemic, during the Winter 2020 semester, there were a total of 5 suspected cases,

    Due Diligence Report Q4 2020
    3
    /
    28
    of which only one was positive. As the pandemic continued, regional public health authorities provided
    the university with protocols for dealing with COVID-19. In preparation for In-Person Teaching Activities
    in the Fall of 2020, we developed and implemented detailed
    procedures for dealing with suspected or
    confirmed COVID-19 cases
    (one for employees and one for students). The procedures define roles and
    responsibilities in the event of a suspected or confirmed COVID-19 case on university property and
    describe the protocol to assist the individual experiencing symptoms and prevent the spread of the virus
    on campus and beyond. The procedures are limited in scope in that they only address situations in
    which individuals were on campus at the moment they developed symptoms or up to 48 hours prior to
    developing symptoms. The focus is to ensure the health and safety of the university community on
    campus. The procedures meet the requirements of the
    Direction régionale de santé publique de
    Montréal
    and the
    Commission des normes, de l’équité,
    (CN
    d
    E
    e
    SST
    l
    ) as
    a santé et de la sécurité du travail
    indicated
    in the « Guide de normes sanitaires en milieu de travail pour le réseau de l’enseignement
    supérieur
    COVID-19 ». With Environmental Health & Safety, a small, dedicated team was put in place
    to deal with COVID cases, including an Occupational Health and Infection Control Advisor, a welcomed
    addition to the department.
    From August to December 2020, there were 25 COVID-19 cases on campus (again limited to individuals
    who were on campus when they developed symptoms or who were on campus 48 hours prior to
    developing symptoms.
    There was only one case of community spread in the university in 2020. The case involved two students;
    it was determined that the transmission of the virus between the two students was due to non-
    compliance with public health directives. In all, the low case numbers, coupled with one case of
    community spread linked to non-compliance indicates that the preventive measures put in place to
    prevent and limit the spread of the virus at the university appear to be working.
    The pandemic brought unprecedented demands on EHS and the team rose to the challenge. I would like
    to recognize the senior leadership of the university; without their support, we would not have been able
    to implement the necessary public health preventive measures and procedures. Finally, I would like to
    thank all Concordians for respec-19
    directives antd
    ipnrog
    cedutresh.
    e
    Coullecntiivelvy,
    ersity’s COVID
    our efforts have kept our community safe.
    Pietro Gasparrini, C.I.H.
    Director, Environmental Health & Safety

    Due Diligence Report Q4 2020
    4
    /
    28
    Section A:
    Leading Safety Key Performance Indicators
    1. Safety & Security Training
    During the period of October 1 to December 31, 2020, the transition to on-line learning for safety
    training continued. There were
    13
    training sessions that took place, either in-person or via video
    conference, with a total of
    1449
    participants. Of those who took safety training during the fourth
    quarter, 942 (65%) completed COVID-19-related training. As of September 2020, 3 different COVID-19-
    related safety trainings are available via Moodle. For students, there is a training for In-Person Activities
    and another for access to Library Study Spaces. For faculty, staff and graduate students with recurring
    access to campus, including for research or teaching purposes, COVID-19 Safety Training for General
    Campus Access is required.
    2019 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    2019
    Full Year
    2020 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    2020
    Full Year
    Total Safety Training Sessions
    65
    304
    13
    163
    Total Participants
    648
    2686
    1449
    9556
    The pandemic had an impact on both the number of training sessions provided and the number of
    participants. Concerning the number of sessions, the pandemic accelerated the adoption of on-line
    training delivery since in-person safety training was not possible for a period of time. Therefore, the
    decrease in the number of sessions (over 70%) did not affect our ability to provide safety training; it
    simply highlights the transition to an online delivery method.
    Only since 2018 has security training data been integrated into this KPI, therefore 5-year trend data is
    unavailable. However, 3-year data is available and is included in the table below; COVID-19-related
    training was excluded from the table in order to provide a more accurate picture of the security and
    safety training delivered.
    2018
    Full Year
    2019
    Full Year
    2020
    Full year
    EHS Training Sessions
    (excluding COVID-related training)
    207
    264
    72
    Security Training Sessions
    57
    40
    9
    Total Training Sessions
    264
    304
    81
    EHS Training Participants
    (excluding COVID-related training)
    2322
    2314
    1519
    Security Training Participants
    354
    372
    97
    Total Participants
    2676
    2686
    1616
    The 40% decrease in participants in 2020 compared to 2019 can be explained by the decrease in overall
    activity on campus due to the pandemic. For example, in 2020, there was a decrease in the number of
    undergraduate students who worked in research labs, especially during the summer.

    Due Diligence Report Q4 2020
    5
    /
    28
    Graph 1 and 2 presents 5-year data for safety training only, including COVID-19-related safety training.
    Graph 1: Total Number of Safety Training Sessions per Year (including COVID-related training)
    Graph 2: Total Number of Individuals Trained per Year (including COVID-related training)
    Graph 3: Total Number of Individuals Trained per Year (excluding COVID-related training)
    192
    223
    207
    264
    154
    0
    50
    100
    150
    200
    250
    300
    2016
    2017
    2018
    2019
    2020
    Training Sessions
    Year
    2206
    2560
    2322
    2314
    8010
    0
    1000
    2000
    3000
    4000
    5000
    6000
    7000
    8000
    9000
    2016
    2017
    2018
    2019
    2020
    Training Participants
    Year
    2206
    2560
    2322
    2314
    1616
    0
    500
    1000
    1500
    2000
    2500
    3000
    2016
    2017
    2018
    2019
    2020
    Training Participants
    Year

    Due Diligence Report Q4 2020
    6
    /
    28
    2. Injury & Near-Miss Investigations
    Depending on the circumstances surrounding a reported injury or near-miss, EHS staff will conduct a
    formal investigation in partnership with supervisors. Investigations are conducted in order to:
    determine the root causes of injuries and near-misses, prevent similar occurrences in the future,
    determine compliance with applicable safety regulations, and collect information for workers'
    compensation claims (if applicable). In some instances, injury and near-miss investigations result in the
    identification of corrective actions that can prevent injury and near-miss reoccurrence (see Section 5).
    For the period of October 1 to December 31, 2020,
    5
    injury investigations and
    1
    near-miss investigation
    were conducted, bringing the 2020 totals to
    21
    injury investigations and
    5
    near-miss investigations.
    2019 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    2019
    Full Year
    2020 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    2020
    Year To Date
    Injury Investigations
    2
    29
    5
    21
    Near-Miss Investigations
    3
    13
    1
    5
    TOTAL Investigations
    5
    42
    6
    26
    Compared to 2019, in 2020 there was a 27% decrease in the number of injury investigations and a 74%
    decrease in the number of near-miss investigations. These decreases are to be expected, given the 48%
    decrease in the total number of injuries (see Section 9), the 71% decrease in the number of work-related
    injuries (see Section 8) and the 68% decrease in the number of near-misses. The 5-year average number
    of Injury & Near-Miss Investigations per year is 50.
    Graph 4: Total Number of Injury & Near-Miss Investigations per Year
    58
    42
    53
    42
    26
    0
    10
    20
    30
    40
    50
    60
    70
    2016
    2017
    2018
    2019
    2020
    Number of Investiations
    Year

    Due Diligence Report Q4 2020
    7
    /
    28
    3. Preventative Internal Inspections & Assessments
    Preventative internal inspections and assessments (total number) refer to workplace inspections and
    risk assessments conducted by, or in collaboration with, EHS staff on university premises.
    Workplace inspections involve a walkthrough of a workplace (e.g. research laboratory, studio,
    workshop, mechanical room) to determine the degree of compliance with both government
    regulations and internal policies and procedures. Inspections result in internal non-compliance
    citations (Section 4) and require corrective actions (Section 5).
    Workplace risk assessments are a more thorough evaluation of the workplace with the objective of
    identifying all hazards and determining if the hazards can be eliminated. If elimination of the hazard is
    not possible, the risk assessment determines if the hazard is adequately controlled.
    Workplace inspections are conducted on a more routine basis (annually or bi-annually), whereas risk
    assessments, which take more time, are conducted once and repeated when there is a major change
    in the level or area of activity in the workplace.
    Workplace inspections and risk assessments are complimentary and together form an integral part of
    the University’s comsafetpreheny
    program.
    siBoth vserve
    e
    has eala
    mechtanh
    ism
    anto
    dd
    etermine
    compliance with government regulations and internal policies and procedures.
    Following the mandatory shutdown of the university in March, there was a need to complete a
    thorough assessment of all campus activities
    prior
    to their resumption. EHS staff worked closely with
    researchers, faculty and managers to ensure that their activities could resume safely given the new
    risk, COVID-19. Referred to as Return to Campus Safety Assessments, these are considered
    preventative internal inspections since they help ensure that all public health directives are respected
    in order to prevent the spread of the virus on our campuses.
    For the period of October 1 to December 31, 2020, EHS conducted
    409
    preventative internal inspections
    and assessments.
    Year
    Preventative Internal Inspections & Assessments
    2019 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    37
    2019
    Full Year
    104
    2020 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    409
    2020
    Full Year
    1384
    During Q4, 23 new research labs underwent a Return to Campus Safety Assessment and reopened.
    As well, EHS re-evaluated nearly all previously opened research labs. These labs started to reopen in
    April 2020; however, over the course of 2020, research activity increased and additional researchers
    were permitted to return to campus. As a result, a large portion of the original Return to Campus
    Safety Assessments were outdated. Additional people and increased activity meant returning to each
    space and re-establishing the maximum capacity based on a full resumption of activity. In Q4, EHS

    Due Diligence Report Q4 2020
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    staff re-evaluated 347 research spaces that were previously re-opened and posted the maximum
    occupancy in each space. In addition, 18 Return to Campus Safety Assessment were done for non-
    research/non-teaching areas, 10 spaces were assessed for In-Person Teaching Activities planned for
    the Winter 2021 semester, and 11 biosafety program inspections were conducted. The estimated
    time required to complete the COVID-related assessments and re-evaluations is over 450 hours.
    EHS aims to conduct a minimum number of preventative internal inspections and assessments. The
    annual target is based on regulatory requirements and the availability of department staff, which is
    influenced by the number of other initiatives and projects being developed and implemented by the
    department. By all accounts, 2020 was an outstanding year; however, the quantity of inspections and
    assessments was unsustainable. In order to allow university activities to resume, once permitted by
    the government, the Return to Campus Safety Assessments had to be quickly and efficiently
    conducted. One of the downsides of this was the inability to properly document non-compliance
    issues. An alternative process was established, which continued to ensure that identified non-
    compliance issues were properly corrected. When possible, we will revert to our pre-pandemic
    methodology.
    Graph 5: Total Number of Preventative Internal Inspections & Assessments per Year
    4. Internal Non-Compliance Citations
    EHS is mandated to monitor compliance with both government regulations and internal safety
    policies and procedures. Compliance monitoring allows us to ensure the safety and well-being of the
    university community and to mitigate external non-compliance citations.
    The majority of internal non-compliance citations result from preventative internal inspections and
    assessments, as well as injury and near-miss investigations. Identification of non-compliance issues
    and their subsequent correction improves the overall safety performance of the University prior to
    the intervention of regulatory bodies. Often, a single internal workplace inspection or injury
    investigation can generate several non-compliance citations.
    68
    47
    181
    104
    1384
    0
    200
    400
    600
    800
    1000
    1200
    1400
    1600
    2016
    2017
    2018
    2019
    2020
    Number of Inspections &
    Assessments
    Year

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    For the period of October 1 to December 31, 2020,
    67
    internal non-compliance citations were
    documented, of which 31 were associated with biosafety program inspections. As in Q3, the
    documentation of internal non-compliance citations was not as rigorous as usual, leading to a drop in
    the number of citations. During the Return to Campus Safety Assessments, supervisors were responsible
    to correct non-compliance issues that could not be immediately corrected.
    Year
    Internal Non-Compliance Citations
    2019 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    357
    2019
    Full Year
    1222
    2020 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    67
    2020
    Year To Date
    277
    The 5-year annual average number of Internal Non-Compliance Citations is 482. As illustrated in Graph
    6, the total number of Internal Non-Compliance Citations fluctuates annually. Although there was a drop
    in 2020 compared to 2019, the 5-year trend remains on the increase.
    Graph 6: Total Number of Internal Non-Compliance Citations per Year
    5. Corrective Action Completion Rate
    Corrective actions are assigned as the result of an intervention by EHS, including injury investigations
    and internal inspections. When non-compliance issues are identified, corrective actions are generally
    required. These actions are assigned to the supervisor responsible for the area where the citation
    occurred or for the individuals involved.
    143
    239
    527
    1222
    277
    0
    200
    400
    600
    800
    1000
    1200
    1400
    2016
    2017
    2018
    2019
    2020
    Number of Non
    -
    Compliance Citations
    Year

    Due Diligence Report Q4 2020
    10
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    All non-compliance citations (internal and external) must be resolved in a timely manner. External Non-
    Compliance Citations from external bodies received during external inspection (Section 12) are
    accompanied by obligatory corrective actions and imposed deadlines. Internal Non-Compliance Citations
    (Section 4) are also accompanied by obligatory corrective actions and target deadlines. This metric
    tracks the percentage of assigned corrective actions that are completed. This is tracked by calendar year
    until all actions are completed.
    Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the redeployment of EHS resources to the pandemic response, very
    limited follow-up was possible regarding open Corrective Actions, with exception of those corrective
    actions that resulted from regulatory agency inspections.
    2014
    As of December 31, 2020,
    99%
    (137) of Corrective Actions assigned in
    2014
    (138) were completed
    with the remaining corrective action in progress.
    Year
    Corrective Action Completion Rate
    2014
    99%
    2015
    As of December 31, 2020,
    99.6%
    (448) of Corrective Actions assigned in
    2015
    (450) were completed,
    0.4% (2) are currently in progress.
    Year
    Corrective Action Completion Rate
    2015
    99.6%
    2016
    As of December 31, 2020,
    98%
    (213) of Corrective Actions assigned in
    2016
    (217) were completed,
    1.5% (3) are currently in progress and 0.5% (1) has not yet begun.
    Year
    Corrective Action Completion Rate
    2016
    98%

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    11
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    2017
    As of December 31, 2020,
    97%
    (356) of Corrective Actions assigned in
    2017
    (369) were completed, 2%
    (8) are currently in progress and 1% (5) have not yet begun.
    Year
    Corrective Action Completion Rate
    2017
    97%
    2018
    As of December 31, 2020,
    71%
    (539) of Corrective Actions assigned in
    2018
    (755) were completed, 5
    %
    (39) are currently in progress and 24
    %
    (178) have yet to begin.
    Year
    Corrective Action Completion Rate
    2018
    69%
    2019
    As of December 31, 2020,
    43%
    (524) of Corrective Actions assigned in
    2019
    (1222) were
    completed, 31% (379) are currently in progress and 26% (318) have yet begun.
    Year
    Corrective Action Completion Rate
    2019
    43%
    In 2020, there were a total of
    1222
    corrective actions assigned, the largest amount in a year since
    tracking began in 2014.
    2020
    As of December 31, 2020,
    60%
    (166) of Corrective Actions assigned in
    2020
    (277) were completed,
    20% (55) are currently in progress and 20
    %
    (56) have yet to begin.
    Year
    Corrective Action Completion Rate
    2020
    60%
    In 2020, there were a total of
    277
    corrective actions assigned. As stated earlier, the speed at which
    Return To Campus Safety Assessments had to be conducted meant that the non-compliance issues
    identified that were corrected on site were not formally documented. As a result, the number of
    documented Corrective Actions in 2020 was significantly lower than in previous years.

    Due Diligence Report Q4 2020
    12
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    Graph 7: Total Number of Corrective Actions per Year
    Prior to the pandemic, the challenge was ensuring that corrective actions were being addressed in a
    timely manner. In many instances, specifically with corrective actions resulting from the roof safety
    assessments, the actions can only be implemented when the roofs are redone, which will take
    multiple years. EHS is working with internal stakeholders to re-evaluate the manner in which
    corrective actions are categorized in order to separate corrective actions that require large capital
    investments and time to complete from simpler corrective actions. It is important to note that when a
    corrective action cannot be completed and non-compliance poses a risk to employees or students,
    interim measures are put in place to ensure everyone’s safety.
    6. EHS Research Compliance Reviews
    In collaboration with the Office of Research, EHS reviews research and teaching activities that
    involve hazardous materials, in order to ensure compliance with applicable government
    regulations and internal policies and procedures.
    For the period of January 1 to December 31, 2020, there were
    15
    EHS Research Compliance Reviews, of
    which
    5
    were from Q4 (October 1 to December 31, 2020). The number of compliance reviews in 2020
    decreased by 69% compared to 2019.
    Year
    EHS Research Compliance Reviews
    2019 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    4
    2019
    Full Year
    39
    2020 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    5
    2020
    Full Year
    15
    The 5-year average number of EHS Research Compliance Reviews per year is 33 and the overall 5-year
    trend is slightly decreasing, influenced by the COVID-19 pandemic.
    217
    369
    755
    1222
    277
    0
    200
    400
    600
    800
    1000
    1200
    1400
    2016
    2017
    2018
    2019
    2020
    Number of Corrective Actions
    Year

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    13
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    28
    Graph 8: Total Number of EHS Research Compliance Reviews per Year
    Section 2:
    Traditional (Lagging) Safety Key Performance Indicators
    7. Total Injuries
    An injury refers to the occurrence of a sudden and unforeseen event arising out of, or in the course of, a
    university-sanctioned activity attributable to any factor that caused an injury or an occupational disease
    (an exposure to conditions or substances that resulted in a disease). Injuries are grouped as work-
    related (involving staff and faculty), student or visitor/contractor.
    For the period of October 1 to December 31, 2020,
    7 injuries
    were reported, bringing the 2020 total to
    50
    . This represents a 71% decrease in total injuries in 2020 when compared to 2019. The pandemic had
    a major influence on this KPI. The closure of the university campuses, the switch to on-line delivery of
    teaching, and the fact that the majority of university employees work from home all affected the
    number of injuries on campus.
    Year
    Total Injuries
    2019 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    33
    2019
    Full Year
    175
    2020 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    7
    2020
    Full Year
    50
    Due to the pandemic, the 5-year average number of total injuries per year dropped to 162 from 184 and
    the 5-year trend is decreasing. Unfortunately, the pandemic impact on the 5-year trend means that we
    17
    55
    37
    39
    15
    0
    10
    20
    30
    40
    50
    60
    2016
    2017
    2018
    2019
    2020
    Number of EHS Research Compliance
    Reviews
    Year

    Due Diligence Report Q4 2020
    14
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    28
    will not know if pre-pandemic preventive measures and safety activities were continuing to have a
    positive impact on the number of injuries.
    Graph 8: Total Injuries per Year
    Sports Injuries Included in Total Injuries
    Sports Injuries are a sub-set of Total Injuries. Currently the Sports Injuries that are reported to the
    University via the Injury/Near-Miss Report Form are those injuries (trauma) or illnesses (repetitive
    stress) suffered by a Member (staff/student) or Non-Member (visitor) of the university community.
    These injuries occur during the course of a voluntary activity (personal time), either participating in
    team or individual sport activities or personal physical conditioning, on Concordia property. Whenever
    external medical attention is required to treat the injury, the Security Department calls for an
    ambulance. As a result, the majority of the injuries within this category are reported to EHS by the
    Security Department.
    Year
    Sports Injuries
    Q4 2019
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    6
    2019
    Full Year
    32
    Q4 2020
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    0
    2020
    Year To Date
    4
    The pandemic caused almost all Recreation & Athletics activities to stop, with many prohibited by public
    health directives. As a result, the number of sports injuries in 2020 was significantly less than 2019.
    168
    177
    239
    175
    50
    0
    50
    100
    150
    200
    250
    300
    2016
    2017
    2018
    2019
    2020
    Total Injuries
    Year

    Due Diligence Report Q4 2020
    15
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    8. Work-Related Injuries
    Work-Related Injuries are a subset of the total Injuries (Section 7), whereby the injured person is a
    worker (staff or faculty). An injury or illness is considered work-related when an employee is involved
    and if an event, or exposure in the work environment, either caused or contributed to the resulting
    condition or significantly aggravated a pre-existing injury or illness. Work-related injuries are
    investigated by EHS staff and when warranted, an investigation report with corrective actions is
    submitted to the employee’s supervisor.
    For the period of October 1 to December 31, 2020,
    7
    of the 50 reported injuries (Section 7) were work-
    related, bringing the 2020 total to
    27
    .
    Year
    Work-Related Injuries
    2019 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    11
    2019
    Full Year
    52
    2020 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    7
    2020
    Full Year
    27
    In 2020, the total number of work-related injuries (27) decreased by 48% compared to 2019. This is
    good news;
    however, the pandemic’s in-frellatued encinjuries e
    canonn
    ot bte
    he number of work
    ignored.
    Graph 9: Work-Related Injuries per Year
    Recordable Injury Rate (RIR)
    The Recordable Injury Rate (RIR), also commonly referred to as the recordable incident rate, is
    calculated by multiplying the number of Work-Related Injuries by 200,000 labour hours, and then
    53
    51
    67
    52
    27
    0
    10
    20
    30
    40
    50
    60
    70
    80
    2016
    2017
    2018
    2019
    2020
    Total Work
    -
    Related Injuries
    Year

    Due Diligence Report Q4 2020
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    28
    dividing that number by the number of labour hours during that period. Furthermore, 200,000 labour
    hours equates to 100 employees, who work 40 hours per week 50 weeks per year. The calculated rate
    is per 100 employees.
    Year
    Recordable Incident Rate
    2019
    Full Year
    0.29
    2020
    Full Year
    0.19
    The
    Univers20
    Recoirdtabyle
    ’Is
    nju2ries
    0
    Rate
    was
    0.19
    work-related
    injuries
    per
    100
    full-time
    employees, compared to 0.29 in 2019. The lower RIR in 2020 is a direct result of the decrease in the
    number of work-related injuries and was influenced by the pandemic.
    Graph 10: Recordable Injury Rate per Year
    9. Worker Compensation Claims
    Employees who sustain a work-related injury may be eligible for compensation from the
    Commission
    des normes, de l’équité, de la
    (C
    sa
    NESS
    n
    T)
    t
    .
    é et de la sécurité du travail
    For the period of October 1 to December 31, 2020, there were
    2
    accepted worker’s compensation
    claims. As a result, the total number of accepted claims in 2020 is 36% less than 2019.
    0.42
    0.28
    0.57
    0.29
    0.19
    0
    0.1
    0.2
    0.3
    0.4
    0.5
    0.6
    2016
    2017
    2018
    2019
    2020
    Recordable Injury Rate
    Year

    Due Diligence Report Q4 2020
    17
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    Year
    Accepted Compensation Claims
    2019 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    0
    2019
    Full Year
    11
    2020 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    2
    2020
    Full Year
    7
    The following table provides details on all accepted worker compensation claims for 2020. For each
    claim, the total number of lost-time days in 2020 is indicated, if applicable.
    Table:
    2020 Accepted Worker Compensation Claims
    Date
    Description
    Department
    Diagnosis
    Lost-Time
    Days YTD
    08-Jan-2020
    The employee tripped on a step and
    sustained a knee sprain.
    Facilities
    Operations
    Knee Sprain
    10
    14-Jan-2020
    The employee was lifting a table and
    felt pressure in the back.
    Facilities
    Operations
    Lumbar Sprain
    13
    15-Jan-2020
    Falling ice/snow struck the employee’s
    head, causing a concussion.
    Library
    Concussion
    56
    31-Jan-2020
    The employee tripped on a step and
    sustained an ankle sprain.
    IITS
    Ankle Sprain
    2
    24-Apr-2020
    The employee injured their right elbow
    from repetitive motion.
    Facilities
    Operations
    Tendinitis
    67 (Q2) +
    47 (Q3)
    13-Oct-2020
    The employee hit their head on a duct
    and sustained a concussion.
    Facilities
    Operations
    Concussion
    79
    20-Nov-2020
    The employee was walking down the
    stairs, fell and sustained an ankle
    injury.
    Psychology
    Ankle Sprain
    16
    The 5-year
    average number of accepted wor0. ker’s compensation claims per year is 1

    Due Diligence Report Q4 2020
    18
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    28
    Graph 11: Accepted Worker Compensation Claims per Year
    Every year, the Commission des normes, de l’équité, de la santé et de la sécurité du travail (CNESST)
    assigns
    the University a personalized insurance rate that is based in part on the University’s past
    worker’s compensation claims.
    After being on a downward trend in 2017 and 2018, and stable for 2019, the University’s personalized
    rate increased slightly for 2020. The 2020 rate was set at $0.52 per $100 of insurable payroll, compared
    to $0.50 for 2019. All efforts to reduce workplace injuries and to reduce the total number of lost-time
    days, including temporary reassignment, help contribute to maintaining the cost
    of the university’s
    CNESST program at a relatively stable level.
    Quebec universities are part of the “Enseignement collégial ou universitaire, bibliothèque, laboratoire
    ou centre de
    secrector. In 2h02erc0, the ChNe”ESST assigned those institutions who are not using a
    personalized insurance rate a general sector rate of $0.59 per $100 of payroll, up from $0.58 in 2019.
    Concoprdersoinala’ized srate
    for 2020 ($0.52) is significantly lower than the general sector rate for 2020
    ($0.59); the risk factor attributed to Concordia by the CNESST is lower than the average risk factor of
    other employers operating in the same sector. Compared to others in the sector, we are doing better.
    However, the pace at which the
    Univpersiersonalizetd yrat’e s is increasing is faster than the sector’s
    rate. Our personalized rate was 37% lower than the sector rate in 2019, but only 25% lower in 2021. The
    diminishing gap may be due to several factors, including a compensation claim associated with asbestos
    exposure, and two claims in 2016 and two claims in 2017 that exceeded the maximum for an injury as
    per
    the Univchersiosen
    limitt. Tyhe
    ’us
    niversity will receive detailed data for 2019 towards early April
    2021.
    In 2019, the base contribution paid to the CNESST was $1,379,050, calculated on the insurable payroll
    for 2019 (earnings up to $76,500). In 2020, based on a slightly higher rate and higher insurable payroll,
    13
    10
    11
    11
    7
    0
    2
    4
    6
    8
    10
    12
    14
    2016
    2017
    2018
    2019
    2020
    Acceptd Worker Compensation Claims
    Year

    Due Diligence Report Q4 2020
    19
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    28
    the base contribution paid to CNESST was slightly higher at $1,494,336*
    1
    based on insurable payroll
    (earnings up to $78,500). These amounts, calculated using the University’s personalized insurance rate,
    only represents an approximation of the true cost of insurance. The true cost is only finalized four years
    following the year of the claim; this allows the CNESST to adjust the cost of insurance based on the
    severity of the compensation claims from any given year.
    2
    Graph 12:
    Concordia’s Personalized Insurance Rate per Year
    10. Lost-Time Days
    A Lost-Time Work-Related Injury is defined as a work-related injury or illness that results in days
    away from work, other than the day of injury or the day the illness began. Lost-Time Days refers to
    the total number of calendar days employees are away from work due to a work-related injury or
    illness.
    For the period of January 1 to December 31, 2020, there were 7 Lost-Time Work-Related Injuries which
    resulted in
    290 Lost-Time Days
    . See Accepted Worker Compensation Claims table in Section 9 for
    details.
    Year
    Lost-Time Days
    2019 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    0
    2019
    Full Year
    174
    2020 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    95
    1
    Note that this amount is an estimate based on disbursements in the financial system as the payroll report on
    actual insurable salaries for 2020 is not yet available (this information will be available by the end of February)
    2
    Analysis provided by the Office of the Treasury
    0.52
    0.51
    0.5
    0.5
    0.52
    0.49
    0.495
    0.5
    0.505
    0.51
    0.515
    0.52
    0.525
    2016
    2017
    2018
    2019
    2020
    Rate per $100 insurable earnings
    Year

    Due Diligence Report Q4 2020
    20
    /
    28
    Year
    Lost-Time Days
    2020
    Full Year
    290
    There was a 67% increase in Lost-Time Days in 2020 compared to 2019 despite a 48% decrease in Work-
    Related injuries in 2020 compared to 2019. All of the
    accepted worker’s cin o20m20 pensation claims
    included lost-time. A review of all the work-related injuries with compensation claims revealed that the
    injuries were more severe than in the past, requiring more time for the employees to return to work.
    In 2021, EHS will launch a formal Return to Work program. A Return to Work program is a proactive,
    formal program that aims to help injured workers remain at work or safely return to suitable work while
    recovering from an injury. The Return to Work program is meant to protect employability and
    recognizes that even though a worker may not be able to do their original tasks (temporarily or
    permanently), they can still make a valuable contribution to the workplace. The program is part of the
    new injury management module that will be included in the first release of the UNITY project. A formal
    Return to Work program will help reduce the number of Lost-Time Days.
    Graph 13: Total Lost-Time Days per Year
    Lost-Time Injury Rate (LTIR)
    The Lost-Time Injury Rate measures the occurrence of work-related injuries that resulted in an
    employee’s inability to work the nex-t
    timwore injuries
    kday.
    per 100
    It represents the number of lost
    full-time employees in the stated period. The LTIR is calculated by multiplying the number of Lost-Time
    Work-Related Injuries by 200,000 labour hours and then dividing that number by the number of labour
    hours during that period. Therefore, 200,000 labour hours equate to 100 employees who work 40 hours
    per week 50 weeks per year. The calculated rate is per 100 employees.
    566
    284
    203
    174
    290
    0
    100
    200
    300
    400
    500
    600
    2016
    2017
    2018
    2019
    2020
    Lost
    -
    Time Days
    Year

    Due Diligence Report Q4 2020
    21
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    28
    Year
    Lost-Time Injury Rate
    2019
    Full Year
    0.16
    2020
    Full Year
    0.19
    The Univers20
    Losti-Titmye I’ns
    jury
    2Rat0
    e is 0.19 lost-time injuries per 100 full-time employees. 2020
    was the fifth year that this data was collected; the 5-year average Lost-Time Injury Rate is 0.18 lost-time
    injuries per 100 full-time employees.
    Graph 14: Lost-Time Injury Rate per Year
    Lost-Time Day Rate (LTDR)
    The Lost-Time Day Rate is a rate that measures the length of time an employee is away from work due
    to a work-related injury. It represents the number of lost-time days per 100 full-time employees in the
    stated period. The LTDR is calculated by multiplying the number of Lost-Time Days by 200,000 labour
    hours and then dividing that number by the number of labour hours during that period. Therefore,
    200, 000 labour hours equates to 100 employees, who work 40 hours per week, 50 weeks per year. The
    calculated rate is per 100 employees.
    Year
    Lost-Time Day Rate
    2019
    Full Year
    4.61
    2020
    Full Year
    7.77
    The Univers20
    LTDiR was
    ty7’.7s
    7 l2ost0-days per 100 full-time employees. In 2020, for every work-
    related injury, an employee was more likely to have associated lost-time. 2020 was the fifth year that
    this data was collected; the 5-year average Lost-Time Day Rate is 8.39 lost-days per 100 full-time
    0.17
    0.17
    0.19
    0.16
    0.19
    0.145
    0.15
    0.155
    0.16
    0.165
    0.17
    0.175
    0.18
    0.185
    0.19
    0.195
    2016
    2017
    2018
    2019
    2020
    Lost
    -
    Time Injury Rate
    Year

    Due Diligence Report Q4 2020
    22
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    28
    employees. Although the LTDR was higher in 2020 compared to the last 4 years, the overall 5-year trend
    continues to be decreasing.
    Graph 15: Lost-Time Day Rate per Year
    Severity Rate
    The Severity Rate provides an average of the number of Lost-Time Days per Lost-Time Work-Related
    Injury. The Severity Rate is calculated by dividing the total number of lost-time days by the total number
    of work-related injuries with lost-time. The Severity Rate is a cumulative rate calculated at the end of
    each quarter.
    Year
    Severity Rate
    average lost-time days per lost-time injury
    2019
    Full Year
    29.0
    2020
    Full Year
    41.4
    The Univers20
    Severiitty
    yRat’e s
    was
    2041.4;
    this is the average number of lost-time days per lost-time
    injury. As stated earlier, the injuries sustained by employees in 2020 were more serious and is illustrated
    by the Severity Rate. The 5-year average Severity Rate is 48.2, still heavily influenced by the 2016
    Severity Rate, but the 5-year trend is decreasing.
    16.15
    7.92
    5.52
    4.61
    7.77
    0
    2
    4
    6
    8
    10
    12
    14
    16
    18
    2016
    2017
    2018
    2019
    2020
    Lost
    -
    Time Day Rate
    Year

    Due Diligence Report Q4 2020
    23
    /
    28
    Graph 16: Severity Rate per Year
    11. Near-Misses
    A Near-Miss is the occurrence of an event on university property, arising out of, or in the course of, a
    university-sanctioned activity attributable to any factor that could have caused either an injury or
    material damage. For example, events such as tripping on a stair or slipping in a water puddle, where
    no injury occurred, would be categorized as a near-miss.
    As per the University’s Policy on Injury
    Reporting and Investigation (VPS-42), reporting of near-miss is required. Traditionally, near-misses go
    unreported because no injury has occurred. Steps have been taken to encourage near-miss reporting,
    including discussing the importance of near-miss reporting at safety committee meetings, during safety
    training and new Principal Investigator orientation sessions.
    For the period of January 1 to December 31, 2020, a total of
    12
    Near-Misses were reported, of which
    2 were from Q4. Compared to 2019, there was a 68% decrease in reported Near-Misses in 2020.
    Year
    Near-Misses
    2019 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    13
    2018
    Full Year
    38
    2020 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    2
    2020
    Full Year
    12
    Near-Misses are also traditionally underreported since employees do not often see the relevance of
    reporting a Near-Miss. Near-Miss reporting is correlated to the safety culture of the institution. Given
    that the number of people on campus dropped significantly due to the pandemic, there was an
    expected drop in the number of reported near-misses. The 5-year trend for reported near-misses is
    decreasing, with a 5-year average of 29 Near-Miss reported per year. Pre-pandemic, this decreasing
    94.3
    47.3
    29.0
    29.0
    41.43
    0
    10
    20
    30
    40
    50
    60
    70
    80
    90
    100
    2016
    2017
    2018
    2019
    2020
    Severity Rate
    Year

    Due Diligence Report Q4 2020
    24
    /
    28
    trend would have been a concern, an indicator that
    the Universitwas
    y’s
    wavsafetering.
    y culture
    However, given the pandemic, the decrease in 2020 is of less concern.
    Graph 17: Total Number of Near-Misses per year
    12. External Inspections
    External inspections refer to inspections or audits of University premises or safety programs conducted
    by government agencies or third parties (e.g., insurance provider). Third-party audits include those
    performed at the request of Environmental Health & Safety. These inspections and audits ensure that
    the University’s activities and facilities comply with all applicable legislation and regulations.
    For the period of October 1 to December 31, 2020, there were
    2
    external inspections by the CNESST
    that occurred on October 2 and 19. Both CNESST inspections were follow-up inspections related to
    the machine safety initiative. During the October 19 inspection, the inspector noted 23 non-
    compliance issues (see Section 13). The 2020 total number of external inspections was 6, a 46% drop
    compared to 2019.
    Year
    External Inspections
    2019 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    4
    2019
    Full Year
    11
    2020 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    2
    2020
    Full Year
    6
    27
    28
    41
    38
    12
    0
    5
    10
    15
    20
    25
    30
    35
    40
    45
    2016
    2017
    2018
    2019
    2020
    Near
    -
    Misses
    Year

    Due Diligence Report Q4 2020
    25
    /
    28
    Summary of 2020 Regulatory Inspections
    5 CNESST follow-up inspections related to their machine safety initiative that began in 2018, and
    1 request from the
    Public Health Agency of Canto
    proadvide
    a’s Centre for Biosecurity
    information regarding Concordia researchers who domestically transferred human or animal
    pathogens or toxins
    Graph 18: Total Number of External Inspections per year
    CNESST Inspections
    As of December 31, 2020, a total of 150 non-compliance citations were received over the last 3 years
    from the CNESST initiative to verify
    the university’s comprlegiulatanions. cAe
    s owif
    th machine safety
    December 31, 2020, 124 of the 150 the non-compliance citations (83%) were corrected. 23 non-
    compliance citations from the October 19, 2020 inspection remain to be corrected as well as 3
    outstanding non-compliance citations from previous inspections for specialized machines. It is important
    to note that the 3 non-compliant machines have been locked out by EHS and are not in use since the
    inspection when the non-compliance was identified. Due to the complexity of the machinery, finding
    suitable machine guarding solutions has been challenging.
    13. Regulatory Citations
    The University may receive regulatory citations for non-compliance with federal, provincial or
    municipal laws, regulations or by-laws. Regulatory citations can be the outcome of government
    inspections or interventions (e.g., CNESST, Public Health Agency of Canada, Canadian Nuclear Safety
    Commission) or violations of regulations and by-laws (e.g., false fire alarm citation from the
    Service de
    sécurité incendie de Montréal
    ). This metric tracks the total number of regulatory citations received by
    the University.
    12
    6
    21
    11
    6
    0
    5
    10
    15
    20
    25
    2016
    2017
    2018
    2019
    2020
    External Inspetions
    Year

    Due Diligence Report Q4 2020
    26
    /
    28
    For the period of October 1 to December 31, 2020, the university received
    24
    regulatory citations. One
    citation was from the
    Service de sécurité incendie de Montréal
    associated with a false fire alarm and the
    remaining 23 were associated with the October 19, 2020 CNESST Inspection (See Section 12).
    The 2020, 49 of the regulatory non-compliance citations from CNESST inspection, representing 91% of
    all regulatory citations.
    Year
    Regulatory Citations
    2019 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    4
    2019
    Full Year
    19
    2020 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    24
    2020
    Full Year
    54
    The 5-year trend in regulatory citations is increasing, however it is heavily influenced by the 2018
    CNESST initiative to improve compliance with machine safety and guarding regulations. The 2018
    initiative continued to have an impact in 2020, with follow-up inspections resulting in new non-
    compliance citations.
    Graph 19: Regulatory Citations per Year
    12
    24
    159
    19
    54
    0
    20
    40
    60
    80
    100
    120
    140
    160
    180
    2016
    2017
    2018
    2019
    2020
    External Non
    -
    Complianc Citations
    Year

    Due Diligence Report Q4 2020
    27
    /
    28
    14. Regulatory Fines
    Regulatory Citations (Section 13) may have associated monetary fines or penalties that are issued to the
    University.
    For the period of October 1 to December 31, 2020, Concordia receive 1 regulatory fine from the
    Service
    de sécurité incendie de Montréal
    associated with a false fire alarm that occurred during the quarter; the
    value of those fines was
    $2,700
    . The total value of regulatory fines paid in 2020 was $3,450, a significant
    decrease (84%) compared to 2019.
    Year
    Fines Received
    2019 Q4
    Oct, Nov, Dec
    $2,950
    2019
    Full Year
    $21,850
    2020 Q4
    Oct, Nov, Dec
    $2,700
    2020
    Full Year
    $3,450
    Graph 19: Regulatory Fine Received per Year
    15. Hazardous Materials Emergency Responses
    The University’s Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Team responds to hazardous material
    emergencies that occur on university premises, including spills and odours. Service providers are called
    upon to assist when a major spill occurs and additional resources are required.
    $5,531
    $7,950
    $18,450
    $21,850
    $3,450
    $-
    $5,000
    $10,000
    $15,000
    $20,000
    $25,000
    2016
    2017
    2018
    2019
    2020
    Dollars
    Year

    Due Diligence Report Q4 2020
    28
    /
    28
    For the period of October 1 to December 31, 2020, there was
    1
    hazardous materials emergency
    response by the Hazardous Materials Spill Response Team. In 2020, there were a total of 11 hazardous
    emergency responses, a 58% decrease compared to 2019. The dramatic drop can also be linked to the
    pandemic, given that it caused a significant decrease in activity
    on the university’s campuses.
    Year
    Hazardous Material Spill Responses
    2019 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    5
    2019
    Full Year
    26
    2020 Q4
    Oct., Nov., Dec.
    1
    2020
    Full Year
    11
    The previously increasing trend in the number of hazardous materials emergency responses by the
    UniversiHazardotus yM’ats
    erials Spill Response Team has reversed, however influenced heavily, if not
    exclusively, by the pandemic.
    Graph 20: Total Hazardous Materials Spill Responses per Year
    16
    20
    20
    26
    11
    0
    5
    10
    15
    20
    25
    30
    2016
    2017
    2018
    2019
    2020
    Number of Hazardous Materials
    Emergency Responses
    Year

    REPORT TO THE BOARD OFG OVERNORS
    MARCH 20 21
    GRAHAM CARR
    PRESIDENT A ND VIC E-C HANC ELLOR
    BG-2021-2-D5

    Board of Governors Report– March 2021
    1
    INTRODUCTION
    Though encouraged by news from the Government of Quebec that universities can begin to
    reopen gradually, we have nonetheless announced tha, fort the most par, tConcordia will continue
    to deliver
    remote teaching and learning this summ
    .
    e
    T
    r
    his week we introduced a booking system
    that allows small numbers of students to access str-eleevtel spaces for group work for the balance
    of the semester. This is in addition to individual access that students have had to our libraries since
    September. The activities for which students can register are outside of course requirements and
    on a strictly voluntary basis. Health and safety conditions permitting, this summer students can
    also come on campus for teaching labs, courses or studio work where- peinrson attendance is
    imperative. We are also hoping to hoinld- person final exams for some courses this summ. eGriven
    the evolving public health situation we, like other Montreal universities, have told our community
    that we anticipate that fall 2021 will be hyb, ridwith a mixture of remote and in-person learning.
    In Concordia leadership news, our recently formed
    Equity Offi
    c
    w
    e
    hich was launchedi n October
    2020 – appointed
    Lisa White
    as its inaugural Executive Director, effective May
    st
    . 1We’re excited
    to welcome Lisa into htis role, transitioning from her currenfunct tion as Director of Concordia’s
    Office of Rights and Responsibilities, where she has served in different capacsitiniecs e 2013. Lisa
    is an ideal candidate with deep knowledge and expertise in applying and administering Concordia’s
    Code of Rights and Responsibilities, possessina g strong focus on outreach and educatioSnhe
    . has
    close to a decade of experience working to address issuef sdi oscrimination and equity within the
    university community.
    Following the success of Concordia’s fir-setver virtual
    Open House
    last October, the winter 2021
    undergraduate Open Houset ook place online February 2
    th
    0 .More than 3,500re gistrants from 138
    countries participated inthe virtual even, t which allows prospective students to experience a bit
    of what Concordia has to offer, through virtual tours, live chats with faculty members and
    recruiters, presentations and Q&A sessions. An added benefit of a rvtiual Open House is that
    presentations and tours are available online for a month following the event.
    For the sixth time in as many years, Concordia wnameas d a
    top Montreal employer
    . We are proud
    to be among a small number of enterprises to have madthe e list every year since 2016.
    TEACHING, RESEARCH, INNOVATION
    Mohamed Amine Arfaoui
    (PhD candidate, Information and Systems Engineering) wawas arded
    February’s
    Relève étoile Louis-Berlinguet
    by the
    Fonds de recherche du Québec N– ature et
    technologies
    (FRQNT) in recognition of his article
    Physical Layer Security for Visible Light
    Communication Systems: A Survey,
    which was published in IEEE Communications Surveys and
    Tutorials.

    Board of Governors Report– March 2021
    2
    Margaret Brehony
    (School of Irish Studies)a nd
    Stéphanie Bertrand
    (Milieux Institute)a re the
    latest
    Concordians
    to
    receive
    Marie
    Skł-Coudroie
    wskaIndividual
    from
    Glo
    the
    bal
    Fellowships
    European Commission. The MSC Actions, as they are known, are among Europe’s most competitive
    and well-respected research grants. The program supports researchers at all stages of their
    careers, encouraging them to work abroad and make international connections. Margaret will
    spend two years of her MSC Actions fellowship at tShe
    chool of Irish Studiesun der the supervision
    of
    Gearóid Ó hAllmhuráin
    , Johnson Chair in Quebec and Canadian Irish Studies, followed by a year
    at NUI Galwayin Ireland. Her project examines the interrelated processes of Irish migration in the
    Atlantic World and white colonization strategies in the expanding slave society o
    th
    f c1e9ntury
    Cuba. Stéphanie is researching the social function of virtual museums in collaboration wthei th
    Milieux Institute and Crete’Is nstitute for Computer Science.
    The
    Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
    mad
    A
    e
    kshay Kumar Rathore
    De( partment of
    Electrical and Computer Engineering)a Fellow. At 41, he is the youngest Concordian to earn this
    highly coveted global distinction. It comes with a raft of opportunities for Akshay, such as
    participation in technical soiceties and candidacy for IEEE awards and medals.
    The
    International Association for Pattern Recognition
    (IAPR) awarded its 2020
    King-Sun Fu Prize
    to Concordia’s
    Ching Yee Suen
    (Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering. Th) e
    honour celebrates pioneering research and exceptional contributions to handwriting recognition
    and document understanding in theory, practice and education.
    The School of Graduate Studies led the
    Global Impact Proj
    t
    e
    o
    ct
    glean better insight into the types
    of careers our PhDs pursue after graduation. The study tracks the career development and current
    employment of PhDs who earned their degree at Concordia between 2009 and 2019, and
    successfully located 92 per cent oof ur PhD graduates from that period. The results tell a
    compelling story of individuals pursuing rewarding careers in all sectors of society. As
    interdisciplinary artists, software developers, climate scientists and senior executives, Concordia
    PhDs are using their creative and critical capabilities to tackle some of today’s most pressing global
    challenges.
    As part of
    Black History Mont
    ,
    h
    Concordia’s Black Perspectives Office has been highlighting events
    taking place across the university that centre on acBk l viewpoints. The office has also been offering
    project funding to departments and units interested in hosting speakers from the Black
    community.
    Concordia students in a Bachelor of Science program can now apply for -a cre2d4it
    minor in
    science journalism
    , which will begin in the fall. Students will have access to ha-on ndsreporting
    and multimedia courses in the department, capped off with two dedicated courses in science
    journalism. The goal is to significantly enhance the communication skills of undergraduate science
    students at the university.

    Board of Governors Report– March 2021
    3
    The Department of Journalism also offer
    P
    s
    rojected Futures
    , an intensive and experiential
    summer school that challenges participants to rethink how science is communicated with society.
    Its fourth edition will be held from July 1
    th
    2to 16
    th
    . Graduate students in the program are exposed
    to the foundations of evidenc-ebased science journalism and then asked to experiment to create
    new forms of scientific storytelling.
    Concordia’s
    Institute for InvestigativeJournalism
    launched its
    Clean Water, Broken Promises
    project, a collaborative investigation focused on water systems in Indigenous communities across
    Canada. The initiative involves 75 students from 10 universities and colleges nationwide as well as
    nearly two dozen journalists from six news outletAs.bo ut 30 articles are being released from
    collaborators APTN News,
    Global News
    ,
    Le Devoir
    , the
    Saskatoon StarPhoenix
    ,
    Canada’s National
    Observer
    and
    The Tyee
    .The investigation is based on standardized interviews with water
    operators developed by the IIJ and itcs ollaborators. Between January and March 2020, 75
    students from 10 universities and colleges reached out to approximately 600 First Nations
    communities in Canada. Individuals responsible for water systems in 122 of those communities
    responded through ind-epth, standardized interviews. In those interviews, about half of water
    operators said they are managing an ongoing challenge, from frequent-w
    boaitler advisories to
    plants whose capacity was inadequate to meet community needs.
    After a successful pilot yaer, the
    Connect Concordia
    student-staff mentorship program continues
    to see a rise in participation. Roughly 40 pairs have now taken part in the program.- yeTar
    hird
    communication
    studies
    undergraduates
    tudent
    Emily
    An
    sta
    d
    rte
    r
    d
    e
    Co
    w
    nne
    s
    ct
    Concordia
    in
    fall
    2018. Connect Concordia allows students to be in touch with people who work at the university
    while also allowing staff to benefit from students’ perspectives. The initiative is supported by the
    Sustainability Action Fund, Concordia Council on Student Life, the Faculty of Arts and Science, and
    now is in partnership with the Student Success Centre.
    In June 2020, the
    Ordre des comptables professionnels agrédu
    és Québec
    re-accredited the 30-
    credit
    John Molson Graduate Diploma in Chartered Professional Accountan
    unt
    cy
    il June of 2025.
    The news of theof ficial re-accreditation was transmitted in December of 2020, hence the
    announcement being made to the community only now.
    The 13
    th
    annual
    John Molson Undergraduate Case Competition
    was run entirely online this year,
    between February 28
    th
    and March 6
    th
    . The competition hosted 150 participants from 28 schools
    and 13 countries.
    Tangible Media Studio
    is a new course taught by
    Alice Jarr
    (
    y
    Department of Design and
    Computation Arts) in partnership with Montreal computation arts company, VYV. Students in the
    winter 2021 course will learn how to design multimedia installations, benefitting from access to
    both VYV's expertise and their advanced imaging and digital arts design technoes.l ogiClass
    projects will be designed with specific Montreal locations in mind and students will be able to work

    Board of Governors Report– March 2021
    4
    with VYV’s partner institutions, including such major cultural institutions as the
    Quartier des
    Spectacles
    , the
    Société des Arts Technologique
    a
    s
    nd the
    Grande Bibliothèque de Montré
    .
    al
    Concordia Continuing Education
    (CCE) is designing a new training program for the digital industry
    sector. The project’s funding comes from the City of Montreal’s
    Accélérer les talents init
    .
    ia
    CCE
    tive
    will develop a training program in the IT sector with a specific focus on user experience and user
    interface (UX-UI) design. Like the cybe-rer silience program, the new training program aligns with
    the city’s strategic sector focus on the digital industry and will hll elpt he
    fi gaps where talent from
    a qualified workforce is required in this emerging sector.
    The Concordia-led
    Landscape of Hope
    initiative received nearly
    $430,000
    to significantly expand
    its work researching hate speech and discrimination in Quebec. The funding comes from three
    sources — the
    Fonds de recherche du Québe
    ,
    c
    Canadian Heritage and the Michaëlle Jean
    Foundation. It will enable the transdisciplinary team to hold workshops, create installations and
    performative events around Montreal in collaboration with marginalized communities, including
    Black and racialized youth, and in Chicoutimi, Quebec, with Indigenous community partners.
    Landscape of Hope c-ofounder
    Vivek Venkatesh
    is the UNESCO C-oChair in Prevention of
    Radicalisation and Violent Extremism, ireD ctor of Concordia’s Centre for the Study of Learning and
    Performance and professor of inclusive practices in visual arts in the Department of Art Education.
    The
    Concordia Library Researcher-in-Residence
    2021 -2022 call for applicants is now open. The
    program was created to promote the conduct of research in the library and the use of research by
    practitioners. The program offers the opportunity for librarians, archivists, scholars, or doctoral
    students to focus on an area of inquiry in a supportive and enriching environment, and to interact
    with Concordia Library staff and resources. The call closes March
    th
    , 192021.
    The call for applicants for an
    Indigenous student librarian
    recently closed anda successful
    candidate will be announced in thepr sing of 2021. The program offers the opportunity for an
    Indigenous student to work pa-rttime as a student librarian (or archivist) at Concordia Library,
    while pursuing a master’s degree in information studies at either McGill Univeorsr it
    U
    y
    niversité
    de Montréal
    .
    The
    Library Special Collections
    reopened for research on January 1
    th
    9 to Concordia students,
    faculty and staff. The reang
    di room is open by appointment thredae ys per week (Tuesday through
    Thursday) for twos eparate shifts (9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.). In order to ensure proper
    distancing, only one researcher will be able to reserve a space in the reading room at a time.
    In an effort to support tudes nt success while promoting universit-ywide initiatives and research-
    creation projects,
    4
    TH
    SPACE
    partnered with the Concordia University Centre for Creative Reuse
    (CUCCR), the Curating and Public Scholarship Lab (CaPSL) and the Studio Arts MFA program to
    activate a series of live eventsC. UCCR’s weekly making sessions invited community members to
    learn about creative reuse through experiential learning activities; CaPSL’s major international

    Board of Governors Report– March 2021
    5
    residency project brought together over 300 participants to experience a virtual exhibition and
    conversation series centered on questions of Caribbean identity, migration, and water; and each
    MFA stream found fun and creative ways to walk potential students, established artists and other
    art world professionals through their research practices.
    PERFORM
    held “Engaging performance audiences as listeners of a restorative justice process in
    the context of sexual abus” e with guest speaker
    Luis Sotelo Castr
    ,
    o
    Associate Professor,
    Department of Theatre, on February 2
    th
    4.
    Emily Coffey
    , Department of Psychology and PERFORM
    research member, also gave a brief talk on her research. PERFORM hosWted
    eara“ ble Sleep
    Technologies: Toward Pervasive Health Managemen” twith guest speaker
    Mohamad Forouzanfar
    ,
    École de technologie supérieur
    ,
    e
    on March 10
    th
    .
    Christophe Grova
    , Department of Physics and
    PERFORM research member, also gave a brief talk on his research.
    On February 11
    th
    , the
    Leonard and Bina Ellen Art Gallery
    re-opened to the public with the
    exhibition
    Going to, Making Do, Passing Just the Sam
    by
    e
    artists
    Edith Brunette
    and
    François
    Lemieux
    .Th e gallery launched the online version of Sightings.
    Sightings 31 What is a w
    is
    ee
    a
    d?
    collaborative project by
    Eve Tagny
    and
    Io Makandal
    that aims to challenge Western perceptions
    of and relationships with nature. Since the month of April, the gallery has organized more than 19
    online events and launched the recurrent se-mani nual program, “Terms." One term each year will
    be addressed from two different angles in two editions. The term for -221
    020is “vulnerability.”
    Also at the Gallery, on February
    th
    8was the launch of the publication
    Vincent Meessen. Blues Kl
    ,
    air
    a 312-page fully illustratedbi lingual book with essays by six different authors on the project Blues
    Klair that investigates the presence of colonialism in modernity.
    SERVICES AND SUSTAINABILITY SECTOR
    An
    equity census
    was launched in collaboration with the Office of the Provost in order to help
    Concordia achieve its goal to see all members of the community not only reflected, but welcomed,
    included and supported in their efforts to contribute to all areas of university life. This census will
    also allow Concordia to meet its government reporting obligations to the
    Commission des droits
    de la personnee t des droits de la jeunesse
    (CDPDJ).
    The
    Employee Assistance Program
    (EAP) was extended to August 3
    st
    1, 2021 for those who do not
    have access to insuredhe alth benefits.
    In February the university launched amndatory
    cybersecurity training
    for all staff and faculty
    members.
    The
    Sustainability Living Lab
    has been launched through a partnership with the Sustainability
    Action Fund (SAF) for the Sustainability Living Labs Funding Program. The University will be
    contributing $40,000 towards projects, which will be matched by the SAF. A targeted stakeholder

    Board of Governors Report– March 2021
    6
    consultation will take place pertaining to Concordia’s needs and capacities to build a supportive
    framework for mult-istakeholder sustainability projects at the university.
    In solidarity with individuals experiencing food insecurity, Hospitality’s Food iSceervs and Aramark
    will participate in an event titled
    Cui
    sine Solidaire
    ” with
    La tablée des chef
    in
    s
    March, with the
    goal of preparing 1,000 meals to distribute to shelters. Out of those 1,000 meals, Hospitality is
    seeking to provide 350 meals to Concordia studentspe exriencing food security issues.
    Renovation upgrades
    to all 53 bedrooms (showers anhed ating units) in the
    Jesuit Residenc
    on
    e
    Loyola Campus are complete.
    UNIVERSITY ADVANCEMENT
    The
    Rossy Foundation
    made a gift of
    $350,578
    to support the Institute for Investigative
    Journalism’s (IIJ) “State of Surveillance” project. The project will include research and interviews
    led by journalism students and other collaborators on the topic of data privacy.
    The IIJ also received a
    $162,089
    grant from
    Google’s GNI Innovation Challeng
    t
    e
    o create a data
    hub. This searchable, use-frriendly platform will serve as a digital repository for data sets, analyses,
    maps, access to information requests, sources, interview transcripts and otherrmin aftoion
    acquired over the course of the IIJ’s work.
    A
    $150,000
    gift from the
    Jean-Paul Riopelle Foundation
    will establish the Jea-nPaul Riopelle
    Foundation Fund at Concordia’s Centre for Oral History and Digital Storytelling (COHDS). The fund
    will support an innovative and mult-ci hannel project, driven by top students, which will celebrate
    Jean-Paul Riopelle’s life and artistic legacy.
    Mitchell Kendall
    made a gift of
    $115,000
    to create the Nicole and Mitchell Kendall Endowment in
    support of the Nicole andM itchell Kendall Bursary. The bursary supports female undergraduates
    at Concordia who are residents or former residents of On Our Own, -a fonor-ptrofit community
    organization that provides subsidized housing, programs and services for young parents.
    The
    Naim S. Mahlab Foundation
    gave
    $100,000
    towards the Naim Mahlab Fellowships
    Endowment, which supports students enrolled in Jewish and Israeli Studies, and the Student
    Emergency and Food Fund.
    Brian Neysmith
    , BSc 66, former Board of Governors member, haas de manother
    $75,000
    gift to
    fund the Carolyn and Brian Neysmith Graduate Fellowships. Brother
    John Neysm
    ,
    i
    B
    th
    Comm 68,
    BA 72, a student mentor, dedicated volunteer and l-otingme donor gave an additional
    $50,000
    to
    the Neysmith Family Undergraduate Bursaries.

    Board of Governors Report– March 2021
    7
    Tulsi N. Mirchandane
    ,
    y
    AMBA 00, gave
    $50,000
    to her Tulsi Nowlakha Mirchandaney Endowment,
    which supports students enrolled in Supply Chain Operations Management at the John Molson
    School of Business.
    An anonymous donor gave
    $50,000
    to support the varsity men’s hockey program at Concordia.
    Ralph J. Zarboni
    , BComm 73, gave
    $44,659
    towards his bursary endowment for students enrolled
    in commerce or engineering.
    Engineer, inventor and entrepreneur
    Robert A. Wa
    ,
    lsh
    BSc 63, LLD 09, haso udbled his
    commitment to students enrolled at the Gina Cody School with a gift
    $40,
    of
    000
    towards the
    Robert Walsh Entrance Scholarship in Engineering and Computer Science.
    Gabriel Safdie
    , BA 64, established the Gabriel Safdie Award in Creative Writing with a gift of
    $30,000
    . The award will encourage fu-lltime undergraduate students enrolled in the Major in
    Creative Writing or the Honours in English and Creative Writing program at the Faculty of Arts and
    Science.
    With a
    $30,000
    gift, the Steve Ho-nYing Seto Scholarship has been established by
    Ben H. Szt
    in
    o
    memory of his brother Steve Hon-Ying Seto, BSc 78, MSc 82, to support undergraduate students
    in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.
    The Shirley Reed Graduate Scholarship, the result of a newly established partnership with the
    Tenaquip Foundation
    , will provide two Painting and Drawing MFA candidates with
    $15,
    e
    00
    ac
    0
    h,
    over two years. Founded by Shirley Reed in honour of her late husband Kenneth George Reed, the
    Tenaquip Foundation has donated voer $20 million since 2006 towards causes such as children’s
    welfare, homelessness, medical research and poverty.
    Paul Pathy
    made a gift of
    $25,000
    to support two athletic therapy awards named in honour of
    Concordia Physio Sport c-ofounders Dave Campbell, BSc 78, and Ron Rappel, BSc 85.
    A gift of
    $25,000
    by
    Select Vantage Inc.
    will support both undergraduate and MBA case
    competition programs at the John Molson School of Business. Select Vantage’s CEO and president,
    Daniel Schlaepfer
    , MBA 08, was named to both Concordia’s 50 Under 50 Shaping Business and
    Canada’s Top 40 Under 40 lists in 2019.
    In community engagement news:
    The first event of 2021, an Alumni Career Services initiative with Concordia Continuing Education,
    featured speaker
    Vesna Pankovsk
    ,
    a
    GrCert 09, on the topic of “Communicating with emotional
    intelligence.” The seminar was attended by 300 guests.

    Board of Governors Report– March 2021
    8
    A second event held in January aimed to support the
    professional development of Black stude
    .
    nts
    Led
    by
    student
    ambassadors
    and
    sponsored
    by
    the
    Black
    Alum
    ,
    n
    t
    i
    he
    N
    ev
    e
    ent
    tw
    fea
    o
    tur
    r
    e
    k
    d
    alumni speakers and industry recruiters. More than 200 people registered, with 166 total guests
    in attendance, 146 of whom were made up of alumni, staff and students. Participants included 52
    alumni, 68 students, 11 company recruitment booths and 46 friends of Concordia. Students,
    alumni and professionals alike were engaged with the content as it was delivered and were active
    on social media, in the chat box and in the mentorship breakout rooms throughout the cof
    ourse
    the event.

    BG-2021- 2-D6
    BOARD OF GOVERNORS
    OPEN SESSION
    Meeting of March 10, 2021
    AGENDA ITEM:
    Finance Committee recommendation regarding ervisions to
    Procurement
    Policy
    (CFO-20)
    ACTION REQUIRED:
    For approval
    SUMMARY:
    The Finance Committee reviewed revisions to the
    Procurement Policy
    (CFO-20)
    at its meeting of January 14, 2021 and is recommending Board approval thereof.
    BACKGROUND:
    CFO-20 was last revised in 2013. Thpe roposed revisions aim to achieve a
    comprehensive structure focused on clarity, transparency and user
    experience. The
    highlights of the main revisions are detailed in the attachepd resentation.
    DRAFT MOTION:
    That, on recommendation of the Finance Committee, the Board of
    Governors approve the revisions toh te
    Procurement Policy
    (CFO-20).
    PREPARED BY:
    Name:
    Danielle Tessier
    Date:
    February 9, 2021

    New Procurement Policy– CFO-20
    Board of Governors
    March 10, 2021

    2
    Objectives
    More flexibility and autonomy for en-dusers for procurements under the public tendering threshold.
    Integrate best practices and sustainable vision for the management of procurement activities.
    Improved agility, efficiency and quick processes for low value procurements.
    Reallocation of resources to strategic activities (master contracts, high risk, hig-hlyregulated
    procurements).
    Standardized processes with clear guidelines.
    Process enhancements to leverage UNITY (SAP/ARIBA) best--inclass functionalities.
    Continued compliance with applicable legislation.
    Controls and Processes by Procurement Services in case of non-compliance.

    3
    Key pillars
    A) User Experience and Processes
    A comprehensive structure focused on clarify, transparency and user experience.
    Clarification of authorized procurement channels. Incorporating catalogue buying in ARIBA.
    Cooperation with other public organizations will be increased.
    B) Governance
    Clarifying roles, responsibilities and accountabilities of Procurement Services and key stakeholders
    involved in the procurement cycle.
    Exceptions to policy process documented

    4
    Key pillars
    C) Legal and Compliance
    Explaining the role of the RARC (Responsablede l’applicationdes règles contractuelles). The
    RARC is accountable for the University’s compliance with contract rules prescribed LCOPb y
    and
    the regulations, policies and directives under LCOP (Loisur les contratsdes organismes publics).
    The CFO is the RARC for Concordia.
    Addition of new legislative requirements such as the AMP (
    Losui r l’autoritédes marchés publics)
    and associated processes relating to vendor complaints during the procurement process.
    Monitoring and addressing non-compliance to policy such as splitting of purchases and -ofconf tract
    purchases.
    Use of standardized terms and conditions established by Legal Services.
    Process controls, supported by measures in case of willful and/or repeated non-compliance.

    5
    Ethical Procurement and Vendor Relations
    New section on Ethical Procurement and vendor relations
    Stronger focus on the following areas:
    Corruption and collusion in contract management processes. Includes awareness of new plan that
    was created Aug 2019 for monitoring of criteria for corruption and collusion in the contracting
    process.
    Conflicts of interest
    Segregation of duties
    New procedure for vendor complaints (AMP)
    Confidentiality of vendor information
    Fair competition
    Solicitation of vendors

    6
    Sustainability and social responsibility
    New section on sustainability and social responsibility
    We are encouraging procurement practices that support the following:
    Environmental protection and preservation
    Efficient, effective and ethical use and distribution of resources
    Supplier diversity – underrepresented groups
    Economic and social development
    Local procurement
    The University will endeavour to procure Goods and/or Services from businesses with sustainable practices,
    businesses owned by members of Underrepresented Groups, local Vendors as well as small and medi-sumized
    Vendors, the whole in compliance with University policies and procedures as well as with Public Procurement
    Laws.
    Note:
    LCOP provides very limited capacity and agility regarding sustainability, social responsibility
    and local procurement.
    Opportunity for procurements under the public tendering threshold ($105,700)

    7
    Consultation and Next Steps

    8
    Consultation and Next Steps
    Completed consultations - Internal
    Procurement Advisory Committee – Since Nov 2018
    Regular consultations every 3 months with member on proposed policy changes.
    Gina Cody School Council– March 2020
    Research Advisory Group – March 2020
    Academic Cabinet– June 2020
    President’s Executive group –June 2020
    Completed consultations and validation – External
    Benchmark with other universities Procurement Policies:
    McGill, Université Laval, Université de Montréal, University of Ottawa, UQAM, Université de Sherbrooke, University of
    Toronto, Western University, University of Alberta, Carleton UniversitQy, ueen’s University, McMaster University, University
    of Guelph, UWindsor.
    Others: Metrolinx (Government of Ontario), Ontario Broader Public Sector Procurement Directive.
    Integration of Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor framework and rules.
    Approvals required
    Finance Committee – January 14, 2021
    Board of Governors – March 2021
    Implementation – May 2021


    PROCUREMENT POLICY
    Effective Date:
    [insert date]
    Approval Authority:
    Board of Governors
    Supersedes /Amends:
    April 26, 2013
    Policy Number:
    CFO-20
    PREAMBLE
    This Policy regulates the Procurement of Goods and/or Services (as such expressions are
    defined below)
    made by Concordia University (the “University”). The terms, guidelines and
    restrictions contained in this Policy and its related
    Procurement Handbook
    serve to ensure the
    efficient, sustainable, economical and ethical Procurement of Goods and/or Services while
    complying with the legislative and regulatory framework applicable to the University.
    This Policy sets forth the following five principles, which collectively serve as the cornerstone
    for any Procurement activity conducted by the University:
    Accountability
    The University is Accountable (as defined below) for regulating
    Procurement activities in reference to federal and provincial laws and directives, and for
    the results of Procurement decisions.
    Transparency
    All stakeholders have equal access to information on Procurement
    opportunities, activities and results.
    Service excellence
    Procurement Services is focused on delivering high-quality service
    to all stakeholders throughout the Procurement cycle. This includes, without limitation,
    setting quality service standards, timely and transparent communications, employee
    training and support for the University.
    Continuous improvement
    Procurement Services is dedicated to continuously
    improving Procurement operations, as well as promoting leading practices among
    employees and organizations involved in Procurement activities.
    Compliance and ethics
    When conducting Procurement activities, the University is
    committed to acting with integrity and observing its legal and ethical framework at all
    times, based on expertise, fairness and reliability.

    PROCUREMENT POLICY
    Page 2 of 13
    PURPOSE
    Procuring Goods and/or Services
    is fundamental to the University’s operations. These
    Procurements must be made in compliance with the legislative and regulatory framework and
    in accordance with best administrative practices. Therefore, the purpose of this Policy is to:
    ensure that publicly funded Goods and/or Services are acquired by the University
    through a Procurement cycle that is open, fair and transparent;
    outline responsibilities of Employees (as defined below) and Procurement Services
    throughout the Procurement cycle; and
    ensure that the Procurement cycle is managed consistently throughout the University.
    SCOPE
    This Policy and its
    Procurement Handbook
    applies to Goods and/or Services acquired by all
    faculties, departments and units of the University and to all Employees of the University.
    Employees who acquire or wish to acquire Goods and/or Services must be duly authorized to
    do so by their faculty, department or unit.
    The following contracts and/or third-party transactions are out of the scope of this Policy:
    any agreement which is not a Procurement Contract (as defined below);
    the lease or rental of immovable property as well as any real estate transaction;
    any expenses incurred by an Employee
    for the University’s operations, which are
    governed by the
    Travel and Conference Policy
    (
    CFO-3
    );
    any other contract and/or third-party transactions identified as out of scope of this
    Policy in the
    Procurement Handbook
    .
    This Policy must be interpreted in accordance with the other relevant University policies.

    PROCUREMENT POLICY
    Page 3 of 13
    DEFINITIONS
    For the purposes of this Policy, the following definitions shall apply:
    “Accountable”
    havinmeag to annswer
    s
    for and justify decisions for work, action or failure to
    act.
    “Bidd(s)er” means
    ena
    dor
    V(as
    defined below) who submits, or intends to submit, a bid in
    response to a call for tenders.
    “Co-operative
    Procurement(s)”
    means an acquisition for the supply of Goods and/or Services
    through the
    Centacre
    quisidtions
    gouvernementales, Infrastructures technologiques Québec
    or any
    other group purchasing organization.
    “Competitive Procurement” means a set of procedures used to acquire Goods and/or Services
    through a bidding process.
    “Competitive Tende(s)” rmeinag nTs
    total
    htrheshdoe
    llar
    oldvalue
    of a Procurement (including
    the value of any renewal options but excluding taxes) at which a Competitive Procurement is
    required, as determined in the
    Procurement Handbook
    .
    “Consulting Serprviofesces”
    sional, exmpeanert or strs ategic advice services provided by a
    Vendor under an agreement.
    “Contract Owner(s)” means the individual
    ct
    tas houat
    tlined
    manin ages a Procurement Contra
    the
    Procurement Handbook
    .
    “Delegated
    (s)”
    meUnaitns a unit of the University to(
    as dewhicfined
    h Procurement Authority
    below) has been delegated by Procurement Services.
    “Goods and/or Servicgood
    esor ”
    sermevice,
    anincls
    udianng,
    y
    but not limited to, supplies,
    movable property and construction.

    PROCUREMENT POLICY
    Page 4 of 13
    Employee(s)” is deemed to include:
    a) any full-time, part-time or temporary employee of the University, including staff,
    faculty, postdoctoral fellows, researchers, members of the administration, stagiaires and
    interns;
    b) any physical or moral person engaged by the University on a consulting basis or in
    virtue of any other contractual agreement;
    c) any appointee (including volunteers) of the University; and
    d) any Governor, Director and/or Officer of the University.
    “Non-Competitive Procurement” means a set of procedures used to acquire Goods and/or
    Services without a competitive bidding process.
    “P-Card
    Transaction(s)”
    means the authorized
    hannel
    P(as rocudefined rbelemow) eunsed
    t
    to
    C
    purchase Goods and/or Services without a Requisition (as defined below) through the
    University’s Procu-Carremd”en). t Card (“P
    “Procur(ems)” meenatns an acquisition of
    madGoe thodrous
    gh
    anthe d/or Services
    Procurement Channels authorized by Procurement Services.
    “Procurement Authorrighityt
    to per” fmeorm
    anProcus
    remthene
    t activities in compliance with
    this Policy.
    “Procuremen(t
    s)”
    Cmehaannns, elwithout limitation, any authorized process, procedure,
    platform or application through which a Procurement is made.
    “Procuremen(t
    s)”
    Comenatrnbs
    inactdaing agreement for the supply of Goods and/or Services,
    including, but not limited to, a contract entered into by the University and a Vendor or a
    purchase order.
    “Public Call for TendeComprsetiti” meve
    Panrocus
    remea npt wuhblere Vienc dors are offered
    the opportunity to provide bids for Goods and/or Services.

    PROCUREMENT POLICY
    Page 5 of 13
    “Public Pro(s)cu” meremanes na t Procurement
    (iwnclhuose
    ding the
    totavalue
    of
    l
    anvaly
    ue
    extension option but excluding taxes) is equal or exceeds the Public Tendering Threshold (as
    defined below).
    “Public Procurement Laws” mean all applicable laws and government regulations, policies,
    decrees and directives, including without limitation and when applicable, the
    Loi sur les contrats
    des organismes publics, RLRQ, chapitre C-65.1
    (
    the “LCOanPd “)its
    associated regulations, the
    Loi
    sur l’autorité des marchés
    -33.2.1publics,
    RLRQ, chapitre A
    (the “LAM,
    aPnd
    ”)all
    laws, regulations,
    policies, decrees and directives applicable to Public Procurements.
    “Public Tenderin(s)” meg Tanhthre s esdollhar oldvalue
    threshold determined by the
    government for a Public Call for Tenders, as outlined in the
    Procurement Handbook
    .
    “Regulated Goods” means any
    whGooose Pds
    rocuraemned/nt,
    orr
    eceipt,
    Serstorvicage, es
    transfer, distribution, return, destruction or disposition is regulated by any federal or provincial
    government entity, including, without limitation, any controlled substances, goods and
    products, nuclear substances and radiation emitting devices, biological materials and
    undenatured alcohol.
    “RENA” mean“s
    Reg
    t
    ist
    h
    re
    e
    des entreprises non admissibles aux contrats public
    s” , being the
    register of businesses that are not admissible to public contracts adopted pursuant to the
    Loi sur
    les contrats des organismes publics, RLRQ, chapitre C-65.1
    (
    the “LC. OThPis “)register
    can be
    consulted
    here
    .
    “Requisition” means a
    Prroceuqremueenst
    t.
    to initiate a
    Responsible”
    meanhasving
    the duty to complete a task.
    “SEAO”
    means the
    système électrd’ofon” f
    ,
    i
    Q
    req
    u
    ue
    é
    s
    bec
    d’app
    gover
    el
    nment’s electronic
    tendering system.
    “Underrepresented
    grGourps
    owhupose s”
    repmeresenantatios n in a community does not
    reflect local and national demographic diversity due to historic and systemic exclusion,
    including, but not limited to, women, Indigenous peoples, persons with disabilities and visible
    minorities.

    PROCUREMENT POLICY
    Page 6 of 13
    “Vendor(s)” means a physical person ora
    coma
    mopanyr,
    tal
    hat ofpferers Goson,
    ods
    such as
    and/or Services.
    POLICY
    Legislative Framework
    1.
    All University Procurements must be made in compliance with Public Procurement Laws.
    2.
    For the purposes of the LCOP, universities are deemed public bodies. The Public
    Procurement Laws provide for Public Procurement requirements for most Procurement
    Contracts and set out the procedures to follow, certain eligibility requirements of Bidders,
    certain conformity requirements of bids as well as the process for the adjudication of
    certain Procurement Contracts and reporting requirements, among others.
    3.
    The Public Procurement Laws confer operational powers and decision-making authority
    directly to the Board
    of Governorbus
    t
    (atllow
    he
    the
    “BBooarard
    to
    d”delegate
    )
    all or
    part of these powers.
    4.
    Pursuant to the Board Regulation
    BG-2008-10-D17
    , the Board has delegated the entirety of
    the powers that are conferred upon it by the LCOP and its associated regulations that it is
    empowered to delegate, to the President, or the relevant Vice-President and/or Secretary-
    General, the whole as outlined in the
    Policy on Contract Review, Signing and Required
    Approvals
    (
    BD-1
    ).
    Procurement Services
    5.
    Procurement Services, a unit of Financial Services, is Responsible and Accountable for the
    Procurement of Goods and/or Services on behalf of the University. Where it is more
    efficient or functional for certain units to perform their own Procurement activities,
    Procurement Services may delegate its Procurement Authority to such units. Delegated
    Units are Responsible and Accountable to perform all Procurement activities pursuant to,
    and in compliance with, this Policy and all Public Procurement Laws.
    6.
    Procurement Services and Delegated Units are each Responsible and Accountable for the
    Procurements under their responsibility, including
    ensuring the University’s compliance

    PROCUREMENT POLICY
    Page 7 of 13
    with the reporting requirements of the Public Procurement Laws. Other units and
    departments are Responsible and Accountable for ensuring that Procurement records
    required for reporting purposes are available to Procurement Services at all times.
    7.
    When the Procurement of Goods and/or Services is subject to regulations of an external
    funding agency, and such regulations are more restrictive than the present Policy,
    Procurement Services and any Delegated Unit must ensure that the Procurement of such
    Goods and/or Services complies with the regulations of such funding agency.
    Roles and Responsibilities
    8.
    Formal roles and responsibilities of Procurement Services and key stakeholders involved
    in the Procurement cycle are outlined in the
    Procurement Handbook
    .
    Procurement of Goods and/or Services
    9.
    Goods and/or Services acquired with University funds must be for the sole benefit of the
    University.
    10.
    Goods purchased with University funds are the property of the University. Unless
    specified otherwise by Procurement Services, Goods purchased with University funds
    must be delivered to the University premises.
    11.
    Upon awareness of their needs, Employees are Responsible and Accountable for planning
    their Procurement, taking into account all steps of the Procurement cycle and all required
    approvals, including Board and governmental approvals, when appropriate.
    12.
    Before initiating any Procurement, Employees must ensure that sufficient funds are
    available.
    13.
    Any Procurement of Goods and/or Services on behalf of the University may only be made
    through the Procurement Channels authorized by Procurement Services in accordance
    with the
    Procurement Handbook
    , and is subject to all applicable internal and/or
    governmental approvals. The use of any unauthorized means (including, but not limited
    to, the University corporate credit card or personal credit cards) to purchase Goods and/or
    Services on behalf of the University is prohibited.

    PROCUREMENT POLICY
    Page 8 of 13
    14.
    With the exception of construction, all Public Procurements must be processed by
    Procurement Services, in collaboration with the relevant units and/or departments.
    15.
    Goods and/or Services identified as disallowed P-Card Transactions may not be
    purchased through
    P-tCarhde
    , in
    Uaccnoriversdance
    witity’h the
    s
    P-Card Guidelines
    set
    by the University.
    16.
    Regulated Goods must be procured through a purchase order, in accordance with the
    Procurement Handbook
    .
    17.
    The Univer-Carsity’d
    must be
    s
    uPsed exclusively for Procurements that have a valid
    University business purpose. In no circumstance can the P-Card be used for expenses or
    personal purchases. Employees must ensure that P-Card Transactions are managed in
    conformity with the
    P-Card Guidelines
    set by the University and/or by the relevant funding
    agencies, and that sufficient funds are available for such Procurements.
    18.
    The University has Procurement Contracts in place with Vendors for certain recurring
    Goods and/or Services. Before making any Procurement, Employees must verify if any
    Procurement Contract is available for the required Goods and/or Services and must
    purchase these Goods and/or Services through such Procurement Contract, in accordance
    with the
    Procurement Handbook
    .
    19.
    Whenever possible, Procurement Services will promote and develop Co-operative
    Procurements to reduce the cost of Procurements. Employees must honour the
    commitments and comply with all Procurement Contracts entered into by the University,
    including Procurement Contracts resulting from Co-operative Procurements.
    20.
    It is expressly forbidden to split or segment any Procurement (e.g. splitting a single
    Procurement into multiple Procurements) in order to circumvent regulatory requirements
    including, but not limited to, Competitive Tendering Thresholds and/or Public Tendering
    Thresholds.
    21.
    The Procurement of Consulting Services is subject to the guidelines and requirements
    outlined in the
    Procurement Handbook
    .

    PROCUREMENT POLICY
    Page 9 of 13
    Ethical Procurement
    22.
    Whenever engaging in Procurement activities, Employees are expected to comply with
    the policies, guidelines and restrictions set by the University with respect to the risks of
    corruption and collusion in contract management processes.
    23.
    Where Employees have knowledge of a conflict of interest, as such term is defined in the
    Policy on Conflict of Interest
    (
    BD-4
    ), with an existing or potential Vendor of the University,
    they must report such conflict of interest in accordance with the
    Policy on Conflict of
    Interest
    (
    BD-4
    ) or the
    Policy on Conflicts of Interest in Research
    (
    VPRGS-5
    ), as applicable.
    24.
    Responsibilities for Requisition, Procurement and payment activities must lie with
    different departments or, at a minimum, with different individuals. When it is not feasible
    to segregate such activities, adequate compensating controls approved the Associate Vice-
    President, Financial Services and Controller must be implemented.
    25.
    Employees must not discriminate or exercise preferential treatment in awarding a
    Procurement Contract to a Vendor.
    26.
    Privileged Vendor information must be treated in strict confidence, preserved securely
    and used exclusively for the purpose for which the information was provided. This
    includes, but is not limited to, prices and pricing methods, bidding strategies,
    Procurement Contract terms and conditions, technology, specifications, drawings and
    know-how.
    Vendor Relations
    27.
    Employees are expected to maintain relationships with Vendors in a manner that
    contributes to and promotes fair competition in the market and protects the interests and
    reputation of the University.
    28.
    Soliciting Vendors for donations, sponsorship or charity must be made in accordance with
    applicable University policies and guidelines.

    PROCUREMENT POLICY
    Page 10 of 13
    29.
    In accordance with the Public Procurement Laws, the University has issued a
    procedure for
    handling vendor complaints
    .
    This procedure covers Vendor complaints filed by a Vendor
    during a Public Procurement.
    30.
    Where the University has established standards of ethical, social and environmental
    conduct, all Vendors are expected to comply with these standards throughout their own
    business practices
    .
    Sustainable Procurement and Social Responsibility
    31.
    Employees should take into account the guiding principles and commitments stated in the
    Sustainability Policy
    (
    BD-7
    ) as related to their activities at the University, the whole in
    compliance with Public Procurement Laws.
    32.
    Whenever engaging in Procurement activities, Employees are encouraged to favour the
    use and distribution of resources in an efficient, effective and ethical manner, support
    social rights extended to all people, encourage vendor diversity and leverage
    opportunities for the protection and preservation of the environment, the whole in
    compliance with Public Procurement Laws.
    33.
    When it is in the best interests of the University to do so and when acceptable Goods
    and/or Services are readily available at competitive prices and comparable quality and
    service, the University will endeavour to procure Goods and/or Services from businesses
    with sustainable practices, businesses owned by members of Underrepresented Groups,
    local Vendors as well as small and medium-sized Vendors, the whole in compliance with
    University policies and procedures as well as with Public Procurement Laws.
    Approvals and Controls
    34.
    No commitment may be made, either verbally or in writing, by individuals who do not
    have signing authority in accordance with the
    Policy on Contract Review, Signing and
    Required Approvals
    (
    BD-1
    ).
    35.
    Only individuals with signing authority in accordance with the
    Policy on Contract Review,
    Signing and Required Approvals
    (
    BD-1
    ) may sign a Procurement Contract or any
    amendment thereto.

    PROCUREMENT POLICY
    Page 11 of 13
    36. The
    University’s Contract RuRles
    espCoonsmpablliae ndce
    e l’MoAnpitor
    plicati(
    on des
    Règles Contractuelles
    or “RARiC”)s
    Accountable
    for the University’s compliance with
    Public Procurement Laws and for ensuring the integrity of the Procurement cycle.
    Competitive Procurement
    37.
    Competitive Procurement aims to obtain the best value for the University while
    enhancing access, competition and fairness. Employees must utilize Competitive
    Procurement in accordance with the
    Procurement Handbook
    .
    38.
    Where the total expenditure equals or exceeds the Public Tendering Threshold outlined in
    the
    Procurement Handbook
    , Public Calls for Tenders are mandatory and must be posted on
    the SEAO. Only a designated Procurement Services employee or a Delegated Unit
    employee is authorized to issue a Public Call for Tenders.
    39.
    Notwithstanding section 38, exceptional circumstances may require the University to
    utilize Non-Competitive Procurement above the Competitive Tendering Threshold.
    Employees may utilize Non-Competitive Procurement only in situations outlined in the
    Procurement Handbook
    . Prior to commencement of any such Non-Competitive
    Procurement, supporting documentation must be completed and approved in accordance
    with the
    Procurement Handbook
    .
    Procurement Contract Management
    40.
    Whenever standardized terms and conditions have been established by Legal Services,
    these standardized terms and conditions must be used for any Procurement Contract as
    specified in the
    Procurement Handbook
    . In special circumstances, some Procurements may
    be carried out according to other terms and conditions, as approved by the Senior
    Director, Procurement Services, in consultation with Legal Services.
    41.
    It is prohibited to contract with any Vendor listed in the RENA.
    42.
    Employees are Accountable for the thorough evaluation of their Procurement
    requirements and for ensuring that the scope of work is properly and accurately
    documented.

    PROCUREMENT POLICY
    Page 12 of 13
    43.
    Contract Owners must manage Procurement Contracts responsibly and effectively.
    Payments must be made in accordance with the relevant Procurement Contract.
    44.
    Once a Procurement Contract has been entered into between the University and a Vendor,
    Contract Owners are Responsible and Accountable for the review, approval and control of
    all expenditures incurred against such Procurement Contract.
    45.
    Where applicable, Vendor performance must be managed and documented, in an on-
    going manner during the course of the Procurement Contract, and any performance issues
    must be addressed, as outlined in the
    Procurement Handbook
    .
    46.
    Considering that any amendment of a Procurement Contract affects its terms and
    conditions, any Procurement Contract amendment must be documented and approved in
    accordance with the
    Procurement Handbook
    to ensure protection of the University and
    compliance with legal requirements.
    Exceptions
    47.
    With the help of process controls, Procurement Services analyzes Procurements which are
    considered contrary to University policies and regulations, informs managers and helps
    them rectify these situations. Any exception to this Policy or the
    Procurement Handbook
    is
    subject to the written approval of the Senior Director, Procurement Services prior to any
    Procurement being incurred.
    Non-Compliance
    48.
    Employees who willfully and/or repeatedly circumvent or materially fail to comply with
    this Policy or the
    Procurement Handbook
    may have their Procurement privileges suspended
    or revoked. The failure of an Employee to comply with the provisions of this Policy or the
    Procurement Handbook
    may constitute a disciplinary offence under the relevant provision,
    contract, or
    collective or employment agreement
    .

    PROCUREMENT POLICY
    Page 13 of 13
    Policy Responsibility and Review
    49.
    The overall responsibility for implementing and recommending amendments to this
    Policy shall rest with the Chief Financial Officer.
    Approved by the Board of Governors on October 1, 1996, and amended on December 14, 1998,
    April 26, 2013, and [insert date].

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